22nd April 2014
nationalaquarium:

Today is Earth Day, an international holiday aimed at celebrating our green planet and advocating for its protection.
This year, we’re urging you to consider the other 71% of our planet: water. Head over to 48daysofblue.com, take a pledge and help us show our blue planet some love during the 48 days between Earth Day and World Oceans Day!

nationalaquarium:

Today is Earth Day, an international holiday aimed at celebrating our green planet and advocating for its protection.

This year, we’re urging you to consider the other 71% of our planet: water. Head over to 48daysofblue.com, take a pledge and help us show our blue planet some love during the 48 days between Earth Day and World Oceans Day!

Reblogged from : nationalaquarium
22nd April 2014
awkwardsituationist:

dionys moser photographs the alien like landscape of the ethiopian dallol hydrothermal field, a vast area of uplifted thick salt deposits affected by intense fumarolic activity, famous for being the only known volcanic area bellow sea level and for being both the hottest place on the planet, with average annual temperatures well above 30 degrees celsius, and the most colourful, with its pools of a hot sulfuric acid brine and ferrous multicolored salt deposits. 
awkwardsituationist:

dionys moser photographs the alien like landscape of the ethiopian dallol hydrothermal field, a vast area of uplifted thick salt deposits affected by intense fumarolic activity, famous for being the only known volcanic area bellow sea level and for being both the hottest place on the planet, with average annual temperatures well above 30 degrees celsius, and the most colourful, with its pools of a hot sulfuric acid brine and ferrous multicolored salt deposits. 
awkwardsituationist:

dionys moser photographs the alien like landscape of the ethiopian dallol hydrothermal field, a vast area of uplifted thick salt deposits affected by intense fumarolic activity, famous for being the only known volcanic area bellow sea level and for being both the hottest place on the planet, with average annual temperatures well above 30 degrees celsius, and the most colourful, with its pools of a hot sulfuric acid brine and ferrous multicolored salt deposits. 
awkwardsituationist:

dionys moser photographs the alien like landscape of the ethiopian dallol hydrothermal field, a vast area of uplifted thick salt deposits affected by intense fumarolic activity, famous for being the only known volcanic area bellow sea level and for being both the hottest place on the planet, with average annual temperatures well above 30 degrees celsius, and the most colourful, with its pools of a hot sulfuric acid brine and ferrous multicolored salt deposits. 
awkwardsituationist:

dionys moser photographs the alien like landscape of the ethiopian dallol hydrothermal field, a vast area of uplifted thick salt deposits affected by intense fumarolic activity, famous for being the only known volcanic area bellow sea level and for being both the hottest place on the planet, with average annual temperatures well above 30 degrees celsius, and the most colourful, with its pools of a hot sulfuric acid brine and ferrous multicolored salt deposits. 
awkwardsituationist:

dionys moser photographs the alien like landscape of the ethiopian dallol hydrothermal field, a vast area of uplifted thick salt deposits affected by intense fumarolic activity, famous for being the only known volcanic area bellow sea level and for being both the hottest place on the planet, with average annual temperatures well above 30 degrees celsius, and the most colourful, with its pools of a hot sulfuric acid brine and ferrous multicolored salt deposits.

awkwardsituationist:

dionys moser photographs the alien like landscape of the ethiopian dallol hydrothermal field, a vast area of uplifted thick salt deposits affected by intense fumarolic activity, famous for being the only known volcanic area bellow sea level and for being both the hottest place on the planet, with average annual temperatures well above 30 degrees celsius, and the most colourful, with its pools of a hot sulfuric acid brine and ferrous multicolored salt deposits.

Reblogged from : decadentscience
21st April 2014
clusterpod:

Mottled Black Lacewing, Distoleon somnolentus.

Actually an Antlion. Common names are sometimes more confusing than the binomial.

Big River, Alpine national park, Victoria.

clusterpod:

Mottled Black Lacewing, Distoleon somnolentus.

Actually an Antlion. Common names are sometimes more confusing than the binomial.

Big River, Alpine national park, Victoria.

Reblogged from : clusterpod
20th April 2014
For most of history, man has had to fight nature to survive; in this century he is beginning to realize that, in order to survive, he must protect it.

— Jacques-Yves Cousteau

(Source: nationalaquarium)

Reblogged from : nicholasnotcage
18th April 2014
asylum-art:

Textile art by Mister Finch 

Self-taught artist Mr. Finch creates animals and other objects that seem to stem from Alice’s Wonderland. Inspired by the rolling hills and mossy woods near his home in Yorkshire, Finch forms flowers, insects and birds that fascinate him with their amazing life cycles and extraordinary nests and behaviour.
He then goes hunting for vintage textiles – velvet curtains from an old hotel, a threadbare wedding dress or a vintage apron – and transforms them into all sorts of beasts and toadstools. According to Mr. Finch, his figures are “storytelling creatures for people who are also a little lost, found and forgotten”.

asylum-art:

Textile art by Mister Finch 

Self-taught artist Mr. Finch creates animals and other objects that seem to stem from Alice’s Wonderland. Inspired by the rolling hills and mossy woods near his home in Yorkshire, Finch forms flowers, insects and birds that fascinate him with their amazing life cycles and extraordinary nests and behaviour.
He then goes hunting for vintage textiles – velvet curtains from an old hotel, a threadbare wedding dress or a vintage apron – and transforms them into all sorts of beasts and toadstools. According to Mr. Finch, his figures are “storytelling creatures for people who are also a little lost, found and forgotten”.

asylum-art:

Textile art by Mister Finch 

Self-taught artist Mr. Finch creates animals and other objects that seem to stem from Alice’s Wonderland. Inspired by the rolling hills and mossy woods near his home in Yorkshire, Finch forms flowers, insects and birds that fascinate him with their amazing life cycles and extraordinary nests and behaviour.
He then goes hunting for vintage textiles – velvet curtains from an old hotel, a threadbare wedding dress or a vintage apron – and transforms them into all sorts of beasts and toadstools. According to Mr. Finch, his figures are “storytelling creatures for people who are also a little lost, found and forgotten”.

asylum-art:

Textile art by Mister Finch 

Self-taught artist Mr. Finch creates animals and other objects that seem to stem from Alice’s Wonderland. Inspired by the rolling hills and mossy woods near his home in Yorkshire, Finch forms flowers, insects and birds that fascinate him with their amazing life cycles and extraordinary nests and behaviour.
He then goes hunting for vintage textiles – velvet curtains from an old hotel, a threadbare wedding dress or a vintage apron – and transforms them into all sorts of beasts and toadstools. According to Mr. Finch, his figures are “storytelling creatures for people who are also a little lost, found and forgotten”.

asylum-art:

Textile art by Mister Finch 

Self-taught artist Mr. Finch creates animals and other objects that seem to stem from Alice’s Wonderland. Inspired by the rolling hills and mossy woods near his home in Yorkshire, Finch forms flowers, insects and birds that fascinate him with their amazing life cycles and extraordinary nests and behaviour.
He then goes hunting for vintage textiles – velvet curtains from an old hotel, a threadbare wedding dress or a vintage apron – and transforms them into all sorts of beasts and toadstools. According to Mr. Finch, his figures are “storytelling creatures for people who are also a little lost, found and forgotten”.

asylum-art:

Textile art by Mister Finch 

Self-taught artist Mr. Finch creates animals and other objects that seem to stem from Alice’s Wonderland. Inspired by the rolling hills and mossy woods near his home in Yorkshire, Finch forms flowers, insects and birds that fascinate him with their amazing life cycles and extraordinary nests and behaviour.
He then goes hunting for vintage textiles – velvet curtains from an old hotel, a threadbare wedding dress or a vintage apron – and transforms them into all sorts of beasts and toadstools. According to Mr. Finch, his figures are “storytelling creatures for people who are also a little lost, found and forgotten”.

asylum-art:

Textile art by Mister Finch 

Self-taught artist Mr. Finch creates animals and other objects that seem to stem from Alice’s Wonderland. Inspired by the rolling hills and mossy woods near his home in Yorkshire, Finch forms flowers, insects and birds that fascinate him with their amazing life cycles and extraordinary nests and behaviour.
He then goes hunting for vintage textiles – velvet curtains from an old hotel, a threadbare wedding dress or a vintage apron – and transforms them into all sorts of beasts and toadstools. According to Mr. Finch, his figures are “storytelling creatures for people who are also a little lost, found and forgotten”.

asylum-art:

Textile art by Mister Finch 

Self-taught artist Mr. Finch creates animals and other objects that seem to stem from Alice’s Wonderland. Inspired by the rolling hills and mossy woods near his home in Yorkshire, Finch forms flowers, insects and birds that fascinate him with their amazing life cycles and extraordinary nests and behaviour.
He then goes hunting for vintage textiles – velvet curtains from an old hotel, a threadbare wedding dress or a vintage apron – and transforms them into all sorts of beasts and toadstools. According to Mr. Finch, his figures are “storytelling creatures for people who are also a little lost, found and forgotten”.

asylum-art:

Textile art by Mister Finch 

Self-taught artist Mr. Finch creates animals and other objects that seem to stem from Alice’s Wonderland. Inspired by the rolling hills and mossy woods near his home in Yorkshire, Finch forms flowers, insects and birds that fascinate him with their amazing life cycles and extraordinary nests and behaviour.
He then goes hunting for vintage textiles – velvet curtains from an old hotel, a threadbare wedding dress or a vintage apron – and transforms them into all sorts of beasts and toadstools. According to Mr. Finch, his figures are “storytelling creatures for people who are also a little lost, found and forgotten”.

asylum-art:

Textile art by Mister Finch 

Self-taught artist Mr. Finch creates animals and other objects that seem to stem from Alice’s Wonderland. Inspired by the rolling hills and mossy woods near his home in Yorkshire, Finch forms flowers, insects and birds that fascinate him with their amazing life cycles and extraordinary nests and behaviour.
He then goes hunting for vintage textiles – velvet curtains from an old hotel, a threadbare wedding dress or a vintage apron – and transforms them into all sorts of beasts and toadstools. According to Mr. Finch, his figures are “storytelling creatures for people who are also a little lost, found and forgotten”.

asylum-art:

Textile art by Mister Finch

Self-taught artist Mr. Finch creates animals and other objects that seem to stem from Alice’s Wonderland. Inspired by the rolling hills and mossy woods near his home in Yorkshire, Finch forms flowers, insects and birds that fascinate him with their amazing life cycles and extraordinary nests and behaviour.

He then goes hunting for vintage textiles – velvet curtains from an old hotel, a threadbare wedding dress or a vintage apron – and transforms them into all sorts of beasts and toadstools. According to Mr. Finch, his figures are “storytelling creatures for people who are also a little lost, found and forgotten”.

Reblogged from : of-the-north
17th April 2014

When I was young and unloved,
I was appalled how someone could jump from person to person,
And love so quick and recklessly
Because no one ever told me
How addicting it is to touch
And how once you’ve had it you want it forever

So you live for being packed on to the bus
Or squished on a couch
To feel the innocent warmth of another soul
And forget that you’re alone in your own head

13th April 2014

I just queued a bunch of stuff and I’m going to set it to post once per day. And then I’m going to be gone for a while.

I’ve been doing really poorly in terms of taking care of my mental health and I don’t think I want to be on social media at all right now. I think I’ll be back eventually.


I am Ashley, an incredibly introverted 21-year-old environmental enthusiast.
I'm studying to be a marine biologist, but I live near the Great Lakes rather than the ocean.
I have a fierce love for all living things, a very broad sense of humor, and I'm probably too passionate for my own good.
Herein you'll find animals (especially creepy-crawlies), nature, science, art, some of my own photography, and probably more things about my personal life than you would care to know.
I'm an avid reader and music-listener, so suggestions are always welcome (you can check out my last.fm if you're interested).
I source all of my own posts unless it's my content, in which case I tag it "personal."
But that tag is littered with a bunch of other things as well, so peruse with caution.

Powered by Tumblr, Cutout Theme by Paul Mackenzie