28th August 2012
Much of the continental shelf is covered with deep sediments. Sand, gravel, and pebbles are deposited in shallow water, while find mud is carried into deeper water offshore. An important part of shelf sediments is biogenic (made from the remains of living organisms). It consists of carbonates derived from, for example, coral skeletons and microscopic plankton.
At first sight, sediment plains appear barren. However, many different animals live hidden beneath the surface, either permanently or emerging from burrows and tubes to feed and reproduce. Shifting sand and gravel is a difficult place to live, but more stable sediments occur on deeper sea beds. Varying particle size makes it suitable for constructing burrows and tubes, and it can contain huge numbers of animals, providing a rich food source. These animal communities are all sustained by plankton falling from the continental-shelf surface waters, and by the products of decomposition of seagrasses and seaweed.
Photo © Greg McFall

Much of the continental shelf is covered with deep sediments. Sand, gravel, and pebbles are deposited in shallow water, while find mud is carried into deeper water offshore. An important part of shelf sediments is biogenic (made from the remains of living organisms). It consists of carbonates derived from, for example, coral skeletons and microscopic plankton.

At first sight, sediment plains appear barren. However, many different animals live hidden beneath the surface, either permanently or emerging from burrows and tubes to feed and reproduce. Shifting sand and gravel is a difficult place to live, but more stable sediments occur on deeper sea beds. Varying particle size makes it suitable for constructing burrows and tubes, and it can contain huge numbers of animals, providing a rich food source. These animal communities are all sustained by plankton falling from the continental-shelf surface waters, and by the products of decomposition of seagrasses and seaweed.

Photo © Greg McFall

notes

  1. darwinoid reblogged this from explosionsoflife
  2. explosionsoflife posted this


I am Ashley, an incredibly introverted 21-year-old environmental enthusiast.
I'm studying to be a marine biologist, but I live near the Great Lakes rather than the ocean.
I have a fierce love for all living things, a very broad sense of humor, and I'm probably too passionate for my own good.
Herein you'll find animals (especially creepy-crawlies), nature, science, art, some of my own photography, and probably more things about my personal life than you would care to know.
I'm an avid reader and music-listener, so suggestions are always welcome (you can check out my last.fm if you're interested).
I source all of my own posts unless it's my content, in which case I tag it "personal."
But that tag is littered with a bunch of other things as well, so peruse with caution.

Powered by Tumblr, Cutout Theme by Paul Mackenzie