19th October 2012
Sometimes something really cute can be really destructive. See what porcupines can do to wooden infrastructure if you don’t believe me. However, in this instance, I’m referring to the emerald ash borer beetle (Agrilus planipennis). The larvae of this beetle carve out tunnels in ash trees (as shown above) and the species ultimately ends up killing the entire tree. Since its introduction to the upper Midwest in 2002, the emerald ash borer has killed over 30 million ash trees. Almost all species of ash are susceptible to the emerald ash borer and once these beetles start their damage, there’s hardly any controlling it.
(Photo source) Sometimes something really cute can be really destructive. See what porcupines can do to wooden infrastructure if you don’t believe me. However, in this instance, I’m referring to the emerald ash borer beetle (Agrilus planipennis). The larvae of this beetle carve out tunnels in ash trees (as shown above) and the species ultimately ends up killing the entire tree. Since its introduction to the upper Midwest in 2002, the emerald ash borer has killed over 30 million ash trees. Almost all species of ash are susceptible to the emerald ash borer and once these beetles start their damage, there’s hardly any controlling it.
(Photo source)

Sometimes something really cute can be really destructive. See what porcupines can do to wooden infrastructure if you don’t believe me. However, in this instance, I’m referring to the emerald ash borer beetle (Agrilus planipennis). The larvae of this beetle carve out tunnels in ash trees (as shown above) and the species ultimately ends up killing the entire tree. Since its introduction to the upper Midwest in 2002, the emerald ash borer has killed over 30 million ash trees. Almost all species of ash are susceptible to the emerald ash borer and once these beetles start their damage, there’s hardly any controlling it.

(Photo source)

notes

  1. hidroxxy reblogged this from explosionsoflife
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  10. beetletooth reblogged this from the-milk-eyed-mender
  11. infectiouslearning reblogged this from insectlove and added:
    The Emerald Ash Borers can be spread through selling infected firewood. Introduced species don’t fuck up the environment...
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I am Ashley, an incredibly introverted environmental enthusiast.
I'm studying to be a marine biologist.
I have a fierce love for all living things, a very broad sense of humor, and I'm likely too passionate for my own good.
Herein you'll find animals (especially creepy-crawlies), nature, science, art, some of my own photography, and occasionally a scattering of personal posts.
I'm an avid reader and music-listener, so suggestions are always welcome (you can check out my last.fm if you're interested).
I source all of my own posts unless it's my content, in which case I tag it "personal."
But that tag is littered with a bunch of other, boring things as well, so peruse with caution.

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