22nd May 2013
Over the past decade, the problem of invasive species has become more pervasive in aquatic systems around the globe. With the continued warming of water bodies due to climate change, dangerous invasives can expand their ranges and invade established habitats.
A notable example of this is the Humboldt squid, also called the jumbo squid (Dosidicus gigas), moving all the way up the Pacific coast from Mexican waters to as far north as the coast of Vancouver Island. One of the most powerful ways the species disrupts the ecosystem is that it consumes tremendous amounts of prey. Humboldt squids grow to be over 1.5 m in length and an average of 50 kg (100 lbs) in under one year; this necessitates that the squid feeds constantly, which annihilates prey species in the Humboldt’s range. Because many of its prey items are economically important fishes, the expansion and actions of the Humboldt squid are being avidly monitored.
Photo © Brian Skerry

Over the past decade, the problem of invasive species has become more pervasive in aquatic systems around the globe. With the continued warming of water bodies due to climate change, dangerous invasives can expand their ranges and invade established habitats.

A notable example of this is the Humboldt squid, also called the jumbo squid (Dosidicus gigas), moving all the way up the Pacific coast from Mexican waters to as far north as the coast of Vancouver Island. One of the most powerful ways the species disrupts the ecosystem is that it consumes tremendous amounts of prey. Humboldt squids grow to be over 1.5 m in length and an average of 50 kg (100 lbs) in under one year; this necessitates that the squid feeds constantly, which annihilates prey species in the Humboldt’s range. Because many of its prey items are economically important fishes, the expansion and actions of the Humboldt squid are being avidly monitored.

Photo © Brian Skerry

notes

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    Over the past decade, the problem of invasive species has become more pervasive in aquatic systems around the globe....
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I am Ashley, an incredibly introverted environmental enthusiast.
I'm studying to be a marine biologist.
I have a fierce love for all living things, a very broad sense of humor, and I'm likely too passionate for my own good.
Herein you'll find animals (especially creepy-crawlies), nature, science, art, some of my own photography, and occasionally a scattering of personal posts.
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I source all of my own posts unless it's my content, in which case I tag it "personal."
But that tag is littered with a bunch of other, boring things as well, so peruse with caution.

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