14 posts tagged Squid

22nd May 2013
Over the past decade, the problem of invasive species has become more pervasive in aquatic systems around the globe. With the continued warming of water bodies due to climate change, dangerous invasives can expand their ranges and invade established habitats.
A notable example of this is the Humboldt squid, also called the jumbo squid (Dosidicus gigas), moving all the way up the Pacific coast from Mexican waters to as far north as the coast of Vancouver Island. One of the most powerful ways the species disrupts the ecosystem is that it consumes tremendous amounts of prey. Humboldt squids grow to be over 1.5 m in length and an average of 50 kg (100 lbs) in under one year; this necessitates that the squid feeds constantly, which annihilates prey species in the Humboldt’s range. Because many of its prey items are economically important fishes, the expansion and actions of the Humboldt squid are being avidly monitored.
Photo © Brian Skerry

Over the past decade, the problem of invasive species has become more pervasive in aquatic systems around the globe. With the continued warming of water bodies due to climate change, dangerous invasives can expand their ranges and invade established habitats.

A notable example of this is the Humboldt squid, also called the jumbo squid (Dosidicus gigas), moving all the way up the Pacific coast from Mexican waters to as far north as the coast of Vancouver Island. One of the most powerful ways the species disrupts the ecosystem is that it consumes tremendous amounts of prey. Humboldt squids grow to be over 1.5 m in length and an average of 50 kg (100 lbs) in under one year; this necessitates that the squid feeds constantly, which annihilates prey species in the Humboldt’s range. Because many of its prey items are economically important fishes, the expansion and actions of the Humboldt squid are being avidly monitored.

Photo © Brian Skerry

13th December 2012
dulceinabox:

“This adorable creature is the Banded Piglet Squid (Helicocranchia pfefferi). They’re found at depths of 100m or more, and that odd appearance of a smile is caused by skin pigmentation.
Very little is known about this creatures biology. They have been observed upside down more often than not, but no one is sure why. They are kept buoyant by ammonium ions in its body fluids, and has a large light producing organ below each of its eyes.Image ©Cabrillo Marine Aquarium”

dulceinabox:

This adorable creature is the Banded Piglet Squid (Helicocranchia pfefferi). They’re found at depths of 100m or more, and that odd appearance of a smile is caused by skin pigmentation.


Very little is known about this creatures biology. They have been observed upside down more often than not, but no one is sure why. They are kept buoyant by ammonium ions in its body fluids, and has a large light producing organ below each of its eyes.


Image ©Cabrillo Marine Aquarium”

Reblogged from : siriuslyme


I am Ashley, an incredibly introverted 21-year-old environmental enthusiast.
I'm studying to be a marine biologist, but I live near the Great Lakes rather than the ocean.
I have a fierce love for all living things, a very broad sense of humor, and I'm probably too passionate for my own good.
Herein you'll find animals (especially creepy-crawlies), nature, science, art, some of my own photography, and probably more things about my personal life than you would care to know.
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I source all of my own posts unless it's my content, in which case I tag it "personal."
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