38 posts tagged amphibian

17th November 2013
Lucas and I went adventuring today and found a couple of northern redback salamanders (Plethodon c. cinereus). There was a bunch of broken glass in the area we found the first little guy in, so his tail somehow got cut off in the process of us finding him, but the second little cutie was fully intact.
They’re carnivorous amphibians that prey on worms, insects, spiders, and small mollusks. Considering it is where their prey is found, they spend most of their time in dark, damp forested areas, such as among leaf litter. They do not have lungs, but they breathe through their skin and mouth lining. Lucas and I went adventuring today and found a couple of northern redback salamanders (Plethodon c. cinereus). There was a bunch of broken glass in the area we found the first little guy in, so his tail somehow got cut off in the process of us finding him, but the second little cutie was fully intact.
They’re carnivorous amphibians that prey on worms, insects, spiders, and small mollusks. Considering it is where their prey is found, they spend most of their time in dark, damp forested areas, such as among leaf litter. They do not have lungs, but they breathe through their skin and mouth lining. Lucas and I went adventuring today and found a couple of northern redback salamanders (Plethodon c. cinereus). There was a bunch of broken glass in the area we found the first little guy in, so his tail somehow got cut off in the process of us finding him, but the second little cutie was fully intact.
They’re carnivorous amphibians that prey on worms, insects, spiders, and small mollusks. Considering it is where their prey is found, they spend most of their time in dark, damp forested areas, such as among leaf litter. They do not have lungs, but they breathe through their skin and mouth lining. Lucas and I went adventuring today and found a couple of northern redback salamanders (Plethodon c. cinereus). There was a bunch of broken glass in the area we found the first little guy in, so his tail somehow got cut off in the process of us finding him, but the second little cutie was fully intact.
They’re carnivorous amphibians that prey on worms, insects, spiders, and small mollusks. Considering it is where their prey is found, they spend most of their time in dark, damp forested areas, such as among leaf litter. They do not have lungs, but they breathe through their skin and mouth lining.

Lucas and I went adventuring today and found a couple of northern redback salamanders (Plethodon c. cinereus). There was a bunch of broken glass in the area we found the first little guy in, so his tail somehow got cut off in the process of us finding him, but the second little cutie was fully intact.

They’re carnivorous amphibians that prey on worms, insects, spiders, and small mollusks. Considering it is where their prey is found, they spend most of their time in dark, damp forested areas, such as among leaf litter. They do not have lungs, but they breathe through their skin and mouth lining.

15th April 2013
The bones of Ichthyostega (imagined by an artist in this picture), the most thoroughly studied of all early tetrapods, were first discovered on an east Greenland mountainside in 1897 by Swedish scientists looking for three explorers lost two years earlier during an ill-fated attempt to reach the North Pole by hot-air balloon. Later expeditions by Gunnar Säve-Söderberg uncovered skulls of Ichthyostega but Säve-Söderberg died, at age 38, before he was able to make a thorough study of the skulls. His assistant, Erik Jarvik, picked up where he left off and most of what we know about Ichthyostega (and consequently most early tetrapods) today comes from their combined efforts.
(Source)

The bones of Ichthyostega (imagined by an artist in this picture), the most thoroughly studied of all early tetrapods, were first discovered on an east Greenland mountainside in 1897 by Swedish scientists looking for three explorers lost two years earlier during an ill-fated attempt to reach the North Pole by hot-air balloon. Later expeditions by Gunnar Säve-Söderberg uncovered skulls of Ichthyostega but Säve-Söderberg died, at age 38, before he was able to make a thorough study of the skulls. His assistant, Erik Jarvik, picked up where he left off and most of what we know about Ichthyostega (and consequently most early tetrapods) today comes from their combined efforts.

(Source)


I am Ashley, an incredibly introverted environmental enthusiast.
I'm studying to be a marine biologist.
I have a fierce love for all living things, a very broad sense of humor, and I'm likely too passionate for my own good.
Herein you'll find animals (especially creepy-crawlies), nature, science, art, some of my own photography, and occasionally a scattering of personal posts.
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I source all of my own posts unless it's my content, in which case I tag it "personal."
But that tag is littered with a bunch of other, boring things as well, so peruse with caution.

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