8 posts tagged beach

1st December 2012
Shell Beach, in Western Australia’s Shark Bay, has a unique composition, consisting almost entirely of the white shells of Fragum erugatum, a species of cockle (a bivalve). This cockle thrives here because its predators cannot cope with the high salinity of the seawater. On the foreshore of Shell Beach, the layer of shells reaches a depth of 8–9 m and also forms the sea floor, stretching for hundreds of yards from the shoreline.
(Photo source(s)) Shell Beach, in Western Australia’s Shark Bay, has a unique composition, consisting almost entirely of the white shells of Fragum erugatum, a species of cockle (a bivalve). This cockle thrives here because its predators cannot cope with the high salinity of the seawater. On the foreshore of Shell Beach, the layer of shells reaches a depth of 8–9 m and also forms the sea floor, stretching for hundreds of yards from the shoreline.
(Photo source(s))

Shell Beach, in Western Australia’s Shark Bay, has a unique composition, consisting almost entirely of the white shells of Fragum erugatum, a species of cockle (a bivalve). This cockle thrives here because its predators cannot cope with the high salinity of the seawater. On the foreshore of Shell Beach, the layer of shells reaches a depth of 8–9 m and also forms the sea floor, stretching for hundreds of yards from the shoreline.

(Photo source(s))

26th June 2012
That’s right: giant, majestic balls. In the sand. The beach north of Moeraki on New Zealand’s South Island is strewn with large, near-spherical boulders. Their origin is unclear, but the most widely accepted scientific view is that they are mineral consecrations that formed sixty million years ago in mudstones—layers of softer sedimentary rock on the seafloor. These mudstones were later uplifted and now form a cliff at the back of the beach. There, gradual erosion exposes and releases the boulders, which eventually roll down onto the beach. The boulders are up to three meters in diameter and some weigh several tons. That’s right: giant, majestic balls. In the sand. The beach north of Moeraki on New Zealand’s South Island is strewn with large, near-spherical boulders. Their origin is unclear, but the most widely accepted scientific view is that they are mineral consecrations that formed sixty million years ago in mudstones—layers of softer sedimentary rock on the seafloor. These mudstones were later uplifted and now form a cliff at the back of the beach. There, gradual erosion exposes and releases the boulders, which eventually roll down onto the beach. The boulders are up to three meters in diameter and some weigh several tons.

That’s right: giant, majestic balls. In the sand. The beach north of Moeraki on New Zealand’s South Island is strewn with large, near-spherical boulders. Their origin is unclear, but the most widely accepted scientific view is that they are mineral consecrations that formed sixty million years ago in mudstones—layers of softer sedimentary rock on the seafloor. These mudstones were later uplifted and now form a cliff at the back of the beach. There, gradual erosion exposes and releases the boulders, which eventually roll down onto the beach. The boulders are up to three meters in diameter and some weigh several tons.


I am Ashley, an incredibly introverted 21-year-old environmental enthusiast.
I'm studying to be a marine biologist, but I live near the Great Lakes rather than the ocean.
I have a fierce love for all living things, a very broad sense of humor, and I'm probably too passionate for my own good.
Herein you'll find animals (especially creepy-crawlies), nature, science, art, some of my own photography, and probably more things about my personal life than you would care to know.
I'm an avid reader and music-listener, so suggestions are always welcome (you can check out my last.fm if you're interested).
I source all of my own posts unless it's my content, in which case I tag it "personal."
But that tag is littered with a bunch of other things as well, so peruse with caution.

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