25 posts tagged bird

8th July 2014
Southern cassowaries (Casuarius casuarius) are some of the coolest animals I have ever seen.This lovely lady tried to court me (probably because I was wearing shorts the color of their wattles).Their courting ritual is AWESOME. The females lower their heads under their bodies and vibrate their their entire torso, producing a sound kind of like a bass drum. This is supposed to entice the male, who will run towards the female with his neck parallel to the ground and crouch next to her. At this point, it is up to the female whether she mates with him or attacks him.

Southern cassowaries (Casuarius casuarius) are some of the coolest animals I have ever seen.
This lovely lady tried to court me (probably because I was wearing shorts the color of their wattles).
Their courting ritual is AWESOME. The females lower their heads under their bodies and vibrate their their entire torso, producing a sound kind of like a bass drum. This is supposed to entice the male, who will run towards the female with his neck parallel to the ground and crouch next to her. At this point, it is up to the female whether she mates with him or attacks him.

7th July 2014
Looking quite a bit worse for wear, this male Eclectus parrot (Eclectus roratus) is missing most of his green plumage due to the stress of mourning after his brother passed away. It is common in long-lived, intelligent birds for them to mourn the passing of close family members; as a stress response, their feathers fall out or the birds will pluck them out themselves. Looking quite a bit worse for wear, this male Eclectus parrot (Eclectus roratus) is missing most of his green plumage due to the stress of mourning after his brother passed away. It is common in long-lived, intelligent birds for them to mourn the passing of close family members; as a stress response, their feathers fall out or the birds will pluck them out themselves.

Looking quite a bit worse for wear, this male Eclectus parrot (Eclectus roratus) is missing most of his green plumage due to the stress of mourning after his brother passed away. It is common in long-lived, intelligent birds for them to mourn the passing of close family members; as a stress response, their feathers fall out or the birds will pluck them out themselves.

16th February 2013
The only thing more shocking about the purple swamphen (Porphyrio porphyrio) than its plumage, is its diet. While it feeds mostly on vegetation, it is also known to eat the eggs and even the live young of other water birds. It is one of the largest members of the rail family (consisting of crakes, coots, and gallinules, among others), and its robust build allows it to more or less roam wherever it pleases within its range.
(Photo(s)) The only thing more shocking about the purple swamphen (Porphyrio porphyrio) than its plumage, is its diet. While it feeds mostly on vegetation, it is also known to eat the eggs and even the live young of other water birds. It is one of the largest members of the rail family (consisting of crakes, coots, and gallinules, among others), and its robust build allows it to more or less roam wherever it pleases within its range.
(Photo(s))

The only thing more shocking about the purple swamphen (Porphyrio porphyrio) than its plumage, is its diet. While it feeds mostly on vegetation, it is also known to eat the eggs and even the live young of other water birds. It is one of the largest members of the rail family (consisting of crakes, coots, and gallinules, among others), and its robust build allows it to more or less roam wherever it pleases within its range.

(Photo(s))

16th February 2013
The scarlet ibis (Eudocimus ruber) is most commonly found along the northern coast of South America. It spends its time in swamps, lagoons, and coastal wetlands, probing in soft mud for food with its long bill. Like other ibises, it uses this touch-method of hunting rather than hunting by sight. Its most common prey items are crabs, shellfish, and aquatic insects.
(Photo source)

The scarlet ibis (Eudocimus ruber) is most commonly found along the northern coast of South America. It spends its time in swamps, lagoons, and coastal wetlands, probing in soft mud for food with its long bill. Like other ibises, it uses this touch-method of hunting rather than hunting by sight. Its most common prey items are crabs, shellfish, and aquatic insects.

(Photo source)

15th February 2013
The common murre, also known as the common guillemot (Uria aalge), is a marine bird found in northern waters of both the Pacific and Atlantic oceans. Like several other species of birds—especially ones who lay their eggs on cliffs along the sea—this bird’s eggs have evolved to be particularly pointed at one end, so if they get pushed out of the nest they roll in a circle rather than off the cliff edge.
(Photo)

The common murre, also known as the common guillemot (Uria aalge), is a marine bird found in northern waters of both the Pacific and Atlantic oceans. Like several other species of birds—especially ones who lay their eggs on cliffs along the sea—this bird’s eggs have evolved to be particularly pointed at one end, so if they get pushed out of the nest they roll in a circle rather than off the cliff edge.

(Photo)

15th February 2013
Beautiful and elegant, the blue crane (Anthropoides paradiseus) is native to a relatively small area in South Africa (where it is the national bird). Populations of this bird have seriously declined since the 1970s for a number of anthropogenic reasons. They face habitat loss, bioaccumulation of toxins from insecticides, and life-threatening collisions with power lines. Conservation programs are now in place to aid the recovery of this species.
(Photo(s)) Beautiful and elegant, the blue crane (Anthropoides paradiseus) is native to a relatively small area in South Africa (where it is the national bird). Populations of this bird have seriously declined since the 1970s for a number of anthropogenic reasons. They face habitat loss, bioaccumulation of toxins from insecticides, and life-threatening collisions with power lines. Conservation programs are now in place to aid the recovery of this species.
(Photo(s))

Beautiful and elegant, the blue crane (Anthropoides paradiseus) is native to a relatively small area in South Africa (where it is the national bird). Populations of this bird have seriously declined since the 1970s for a number of anthropogenic reasons. They face habitat loss, bioaccumulation of toxins from insecticides, and life-threatening collisions with power lines. Conservation programs are now in place to aid the recovery of this species.

(Photo(s))

14th February 2013
Although Temminck’s tragopan (Tragopan temminckii) is naturally brightly colored, when the males engage in their courtship display, they show off even more magnificent colors to garner female attention. To do so, they inflate their throat wattle and shake it around until the female is impressed enough to allow the male to mate with her.
(Source(s)) Although Temminck’s tragopan (Tragopan temminckii) is naturally brightly colored, when the males engage in their courtship display, they show off even more magnificent colors to garner female attention. To do so, they inflate their throat wattle and shake it around until the female is impressed enough to allow the male to mate with her.
(Source(s))

Although Temminck’s tragopan (Tragopan temminckii) is naturally brightly colored, when the males engage in their courtship display, they show off even more magnificent colors to garner female attention. To do so, they inflate their throat wattle and shake it around until the female is impressed enough to allow the male to mate with her.

(Source(s))

10th January 2013
The chinstrap penguin (Pygoscelis antarcticus) is most recognizable for its questionable facial hair. These little birds breed on coastal areas in Antarctica that are not covered in ice. The survivorship rates of this species vary greatly depending on how persistent the freeze along the coast is. If sea ice remains for a long time near chinstrap penguin colonies, there is much less of a chance of their young surviving, due to the parents being restricted from the sea (where they forage).
(Photo source)

The chinstrap penguin (Pygoscelis antarcticus) is most recognizable for its questionable facial hair. These little birds breed on coastal areas in Antarctica that are not covered in ice. The survivorship rates of this species vary greatly depending on how persistent the freeze along the coast is. If sea ice remains for a long time near chinstrap penguin colonies, there is much less of a chance of their young surviving, due to the parents being restricted from the sea (where they forage).

(Photo source)


I am Ashley, an incredibly introverted environmental enthusiast.
I'm studying to be a marine biologist.
I have a fierce love for all living things, a very broad sense of humor, and I'm likely too passionate for my own good.
Herein you'll find animals (especially creepy-crawlies), nature, science, art, some of my own photography, and occasionally a scattering of personal posts.
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I source all of my own posts unless it's my content, in which case I tag it "personal."
But that tag is littered with a bunch of other, boring things as well, so peruse with caution.

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