60 posts tagged blue

17th December 2013
The Bazaruto Archipelago is a chain of sparsely populated islands on the coast of Mozambique, formed where sand was deposited over hundreds of thousands of years by the Limpopo River. A Marine National Park, established in 2001, covers most of the archipelago, protecting its impressive fringing reefs and kaleidoscopic range of marine life. More than 2,000 fish species, 100 species of stony corals, and 27 dazzling soft-coral species, including unusual “green tree” corals, are found on Bazaruto’s reefs, as well as eagle rays, manta rays, and five species of turtles. The archipelago is also a refuge for one of the remaining populations of dugongs (Dugong dugon) in the western Indian Ocean.
(Image (and info)) The Bazaruto Archipelago is a chain of sparsely populated islands on the coast of Mozambique, formed where sand was deposited over hundreds of thousands of years by the Limpopo River. A Marine National Park, established in 2001, covers most of the archipelago, protecting its impressive fringing reefs and kaleidoscopic range of marine life. More than 2,000 fish species, 100 species of stony corals, and 27 dazzling soft-coral species, including unusual “green tree” corals, are found on Bazaruto’s reefs, as well as eagle rays, manta rays, and five species of turtles. The archipelago is also a refuge for one of the remaining populations of dugongs (Dugong dugon) in the western Indian Ocean.
(Image (and info))

The Bazaruto Archipelago is a chain of sparsely populated islands on the coast of Mozambique, formed where sand was deposited over hundreds of thousands of years by the Limpopo River. A Marine National Park, established in 2001, covers most of the archipelago, protecting its impressive fringing reefs and kaleidoscopic range of marine life. More than 2,000 fish species, 100 species of stony corals, and 27 dazzling soft-coral species, including unusual “green tree” corals, are found on Bazaruto’s reefs, as well as eagle rays, manta rays, and five species of turtles. The archipelago is also a refuge for one of the remaining populations of dugongs (Dugong dugon) in the western Indian Ocean.

(Image (and info))

10th March 2013
Although it is one of the widest ranged sharks, the blue shark (Prionace glauca) may be threatened by over-harvesting. They migrate seasonally, moving from cooler to warmer waters. Blue sharks sometimes circle prey before attacking and they will gather in large numbers to eviscerate whale or porpoise carcasses. They can also be found following trawling boats, stealing the caught fish. The blue shark is known as a shark species that will attack humans, but just like with any other sharks, getting bitten by one is relatively rare.
(Source(s)) Although it is one of the widest ranged sharks, the blue shark (Prionace glauca) may be threatened by over-harvesting. They migrate seasonally, moving from cooler to warmer waters. Blue sharks sometimes circle prey before attacking and they will gather in large numbers to eviscerate whale or porpoise carcasses. They can also be found following trawling boats, stealing the caught fish. The blue shark is known as a shark species that will attack humans, but just like with any other sharks, getting bitten by one is relatively rare.
(Source(s))

Although it is one of the widest ranged sharks, the blue shark (Prionace glauca) may be threatened by over-harvesting. They migrate seasonally, moving from cooler to warmer waters. Blue sharks sometimes circle prey before attacking and they will gather in large numbers to eviscerate whale or porpoise carcasses. They can also be found following trawling boats, stealing the caught fish. The blue shark is known as a shark species that will attack humans, but just like with any other sharks, getting bitten by one is relatively rare.

(Source(s))

17th February 2013
The blue coral snake (Calliophis bivirgata) is sometimes colloquially referred to as the “100-pace snake” because it is said that a human can make it 100 paces away after sustaining a bite from this animal before they die. However, there are not many recorded cases of human fatalities due to this snake, which hints that the snake gets a worse reputation than it deserves. Its typical prey is other snakes.
(Photo © Tom Charlton)

The blue coral snake (Calliophis bivirgata) is sometimes colloquially referred to as the “100-pace snake” because it is said that a human can make it 100 paces away after sustaining a bite from this animal before they die. However, there are not many recorded cases of human fatalities due to this snake, which hints that the snake gets a worse reputation than it deserves. Its typical prey is other snakes.

(Photo © Tom Charlton)

15th February 2013
Beautiful and elegant, the blue crane (Anthropoides paradiseus) is native to a relatively small area in South Africa (where it is the national bird). Populations of this bird have seriously declined since the 1970s for a number of anthropogenic reasons. They face habitat loss, bioaccumulation of toxins from insecticides, and life-threatening collisions with power lines. Conservation programs are now in place to aid the recovery of this species.
(Photo(s)) Beautiful and elegant, the blue crane (Anthropoides paradiseus) is native to a relatively small area in South Africa (where it is the national bird). Populations of this bird have seriously declined since the 1970s for a number of anthropogenic reasons. They face habitat loss, bioaccumulation of toxins from insecticides, and life-threatening collisions with power lines. Conservation programs are now in place to aid the recovery of this species.
(Photo(s))

Beautiful and elegant, the blue crane (Anthropoides paradiseus) is native to a relatively small area in South Africa (where it is the national bird). Populations of this bird have seriously declined since the 1970s for a number of anthropogenic reasons. They face habitat loss, bioaccumulation of toxins from insecticides, and life-threatening collisions with power lines. Conservation programs are now in place to aid the recovery of this species.

(Photo(s))

11th December 2012
The smallest of the penguins is the little blue penguin (Eudyptula minor). Unlike other penguins, it spends its days in the sea and typically comes on shore during the night. In areas where little blue penguins are common (southern Australia and New Zealand), great numbers of these birds can be seen coming ashore as night falls to avoid marine predators. However, even on land they are still at risk of being attacked by land mammals.
Photo © Frank Todd

The smallest of the penguins is the little blue penguin (Eudyptula minor). Unlike other penguins, it spends its days in the sea and typically comes on shore during the night. In areas where little blue penguins are common (southern Australia and New Zealand), great numbers of these birds can be seen coming ashore as night falls to avoid marine predators. However, even on land they are still at risk of being attacked by land mammals.

Photo © Frank Todd


I am Ashley, an incredibly introverted 21-year-old environmental enthusiast.
I'm studying to be a marine biologist, but I live near the Great Lakes rather than the ocean.
I have a fierce love for all living things, a very broad sense of humor, and I'm probably too passionate for my own good.
Herein you'll find animals (especially creepy-crawlies), nature, science, art, some of my own photography, and probably more things about my personal life than you would care to know.
I'm an avid reader and music-listener, so suggestions are always welcome (you can check out my last.fm if you're interested).
I source all of my own posts unless it's my content, in which case I tag it "personal."
But that tag is littered with a bunch of other things as well, so peruse with caution.

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