54 posts tagged colorful

20th December 2013
One of the most colorful fish in northern European waters, the cuckoo wrasse (Labrus mixtus) comes in two beautiful color patterns. Males (top) are an incredible combination of blue and orange while females (bottom) are pink with alternating black and white spots along their backs. Some females begin life as female but eventually turn into males, an act of sequential hermaphroditism known as protogyny. These males, known as secondary males, spawn in pairs with the females that do not undergo protogyny.
(Image(s)) One of the most colorful fish in northern European waters, the cuckoo wrasse (Labrus mixtus) comes in two beautiful color patterns. Males (top) are an incredible combination of blue and orange while females (bottom) are pink with alternating black and white spots along their backs. Some females begin life as female but eventually turn into males, an act of sequential hermaphroditism known as protogyny. These males, known as secondary males, spawn in pairs with the females that do not undergo protogyny.
(Image(s))

One of the most colorful fish in northern European waters, the cuckoo wrasse (Labrus mixtus) comes in two beautiful color patterns. Males (top) are an incredible combination of blue and orange while females (bottom) are pink with alternating black and white spots along their backs. Some females begin life as female but eventually turn into males, an act of sequential hermaphroditism known as protogyny. These males, known as secondary males, spawn in pairs with the females that do not undergo protogyny.

(Image(s))

17th March 2013
The Crab Nebula was formed by a supernova that occurred just 900 years ago. This event was recorded by Chinese astronomers who described that one of the stars in the present-day constellation Taurus had suddenly grown as bright as the full moon. Over a period of two years, the supernova faded, leaving behind wispy remnants that are now recognized as the Crab Nebula. As the most easily observable supernova remnant, this nebula has been extensively studied. Studies show that the material within the central portion of the nebula changes within a time scale of only a few weeks.
(Photo source)

The Crab Nebula was formed by a supernova that occurred just 900 years ago. This event was recorded by Chinese astronomers who described that one of the stars in the present-day constellation Taurus had suddenly grown as bright as the full moon. Over a period of two years, the supernova faded, leaving behind wispy remnants that are now recognized as the Crab Nebula. As the most easily observable supernova remnant, this nebula has been extensively studied. Studies show that the material within the central portion of the nebula changes within a time scale of only a few weeks.

(Photo source)

16th March 2013
There are two main theories about what has caused the unusual shape of the Ant Nebula. Either the central star is a close binary, its interacting gravitational forces shaping the outflowing gas, or it is a single spinning star whose magnetic field is directing the material it has ejected. The expelled stellar material is travelling at around 3.6 million km/h and impacting into the surrounding slower-moving medium. The lobes stretch outward more than 1.5 light-years. Observing the Ant Nebula may lead to insight about our own star as its central star seems to be quite similar to the sun.
(Photo source)

There are two main theories about what has caused the unusual shape of the Ant Nebula. Either the central star is a close binary, its interacting gravitational forces shaping the outflowing gas, or it is a single spinning star whose magnetic field is directing the material it has ejected. The expelled stellar material is travelling at around 3.6 million km/h and impacting into the surrounding slower-moving medium. The lobes stretch outward more than 1.5 light-years. Observing the Ant Nebula may lead to insight about our own star as its central star seems to be quite similar to the sun.

(Photo source)

3rd March 2013
The family Scolopendridae contains the largest centipede in the world (top left picture), the Peruvian giant yellow-legged centipede, also called the Amazonian giant centipede (Scolopendra gigantea). Scolopendrids are nocturnal hunters and can tackle prey quite a bit larger than themselves. It is not uncommon to see a centipede from this family catch and kill frogs or mice with their venomous claws. In fact, the smallest species are the most deadly within this family and are very capable of holding their own against small vertebrates.
Pictured:Top Left - Scolopendra giganteaTop Right - Scolopendra morsitansBottom Left - Scolopendra cingulataBottom Right - Scolopendra hardwickei The family Scolopendridae contains the largest centipede in the world (top left picture), the Peruvian giant yellow-legged centipede, also called the Amazonian giant centipede (Scolopendra gigantea). Scolopendrids are nocturnal hunters and can tackle prey quite a bit larger than themselves. It is not uncommon to see a centipede from this family catch and kill frogs or mice with their venomous claws. In fact, the smallest species are the most deadly within this family and are very capable of holding their own against small vertebrates.
Pictured:Top Left - Scolopendra giganteaTop Right - Scolopendra morsitansBottom Left - Scolopendra cingulataBottom Right - Scolopendra hardwickei The family Scolopendridae contains the largest centipede in the world (top left picture), the Peruvian giant yellow-legged centipede, also called the Amazonian giant centipede (Scolopendra gigantea). Scolopendrids are nocturnal hunters and can tackle prey quite a bit larger than themselves. It is not uncommon to see a centipede from this family catch and kill frogs or mice with their venomous claws. In fact, the smallest species are the most deadly within this family and are very capable of holding their own against small vertebrates.
Pictured:Top Left - Scolopendra giganteaTop Right - Scolopendra morsitansBottom Left - Scolopendra cingulataBottom Right - Scolopendra hardwickei The family Scolopendridae contains the largest centipede in the world (top left picture), the Peruvian giant yellow-legged centipede, also called the Amazonian giant centipede (Scolopendra gigantea). Scolopendrids are nocturnal hunters and can tackle prey quite a bit larger than themselves. It is not uncommon to see a centipede from this family catch and kill frogs or mice with their venomous claws. In fact, the smallest species are the most deadly within this family and are very capable of holding their own against small vertebrates.
Pictured:Top Left - Scolopendra giganteaTop Right - Scolopendra morsitansBottom Left - Scolopendra cingulataBottom Right - Scolopendra hardwickei

The family Scolopendridae contains the largest centipede in the world (top left picture), the Peruvian giant yellow-legged centipede, also called the Amazonian giant centipede (Scolopendra gigantea). Scolopendrids are nocturnal hunters and can tackle prey quite a bit larger than themselves. It is not uncommon to see a centipede from this family catch and kill frogs or mice with their venomous claws. In fact, the smallest species are the most deadly within this family and are very capable of holding their own against small vertebrates.

Pictured:
Top Left - Scolopendra gigantea
Top Right - Scolopendra morsitans
Bottom Left - Scolopendra cingulata
Bottom Right - Scolopendra hardwickei

14th February 2013
Although Temminck’s tragopan (Tragopan temminckii) is naturally brightly colored, when the males engage in their courtship display, they show off even more magnificent colors to garner female attention. To do so, they inflate their throat wattle and shake it around until the female is impressed enough to allow the male to mate with her.
(Source(s)) Although Temminck’s tragopan (Tragopan temminckii) is naturally brightly colored, when the males engage in their courtship display, they show off even more magnificent colors to garner female attention. To do so, they inflate their throat wattle and shake it around until the female is impressed enough to allow the male to mate with her.
(Source(s))

Although Temminck’s tragopan (Tragopan temminckii) is naturally brightly colored, when the males engage in their courtship display, they show off even more magnificent colors to garner female attention. To do so, they inflate their throat wattle and shake it around until the female is impressed enough to allow the male to mate with her.

(Source(s))

21st December 2012
Jewel beetles, family Buprestidae
Jewel beetles are some of the most beautiful insects. Coming in metallic shades of green, blue, and red, they can sport stripes, spots, or bands. Species lay their eggs in wood, finding the primary mating and breeding areas to be recently burned wooded areas. Their larvae eat wood and many species are lumber pests, but adult jewel beetles feed on flowers and their nectar.
(Photo source)

Jewel beetles, family Buprestidae

Jewel beetles are some of the most beautiful insects. Coming in metallic shades of green, blue, and red, they can sport stripes, spots, or bands. Species lay their eggs in wood, finding the primary mating and breeding areas to be recently burned wooded areas. Their larvae eat wood and many species are lumber pests, but adult jewel beetles feed on flowers and their nectar.

(Photo source)


I am Ashley, an incredibly introverted environmental enthusiast.
I'm studying to be a marine biologist.
I have a fierce love for all living things, a very broad sense of humor, and I'm likely too passionate for my own good.
Herein you'll find animals (especially creepy-crawlies), nature, science, art, some of my own photography, and occasionally a scattering of personal posts.
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I source all of my own posts unless it's my content, in which case I tag it "personal."
But that tag is littered with a bunch of other, boring things as well, so peruse with caution.

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