23 posts tagged coral

26th June 2014
libutron:

Organ-pipe Coral
In spite of its hard skeleton, the Organ-pipe coral, Tubipora musica (Alcyonacea - Tubiporidae), is actually a type of soft coral, closely related to sea fans. It is the only known species of its genus.
Its bright-red skeleton, which is made of calcium carbonate, contains many organ-pipe-like tubes (hence the name). In each tube is a series of polyps (bottom photo), each of which has eight feather- or flower-like tentacles, which are usually extended during the day.
T. musica colonies can reach up to a meter across, but individual polyps are typically less than 3mm wide and only a few millimeters long.
The Organ-pipe Coral can be found in the Red Sea, the Indian Ocean and the central and western regions of the Pacific Ocean.
References: [1]
Photo credit: ©Blogie  [Top] - [Bottom]
Locality: Dayang Beach, Davao Del Norte, Philippines
libutron:

Organ-pipe Coral
In spite of its hard skeleton, the Organ-pipe coral, Tubipora musica (Alcyonacea - Tubiporidae), is actually a type of soft coral, closely related to sea fans. It is the only known species of its genus.
Its bright-red skeleton, which is made of calcium carbonate, contains many organ-pipe-like tubes (hence the name). In each tube is a series of polyps (bottom photo), each of which has eight feather- or flower-like tentacles, which are usually extended during the day.
T. musica colonies can reach up to a meter across, but individual polyps are typically less than 3mm wide and only a few millimeters long.
The Organ-pipe Coral can be found in the Red Sea, the Indian Ocean and the central and western regions of the Pacific Ocean.
References: [1]
Photo credit: ©Blogie  [Top] - [Bottom]
Locality: Dayang Beach, Davao Del Norte, Philippines

libutron:

Organ-pipe Coral

In spite of its hard skeleton, the Organ-pipe coral, Tubipora musica (Alcyonacea - Tubiporidae), is actually a type of soft coral, closely related to sea fans. It is the only known species of its genus.

Its bright-red skeleton, which is made of calcium carbonate, contains many organ-pipe-like tubes (hence the name). In each tube is a series of polyps (bottom photo), each of which has eight feather- or flower-like tentacles, which are usually extended during the day.

T. musica colonies can reach up to a meter across, but individual polyps are typically less than 3mm wide and only a few millimeters long.

The Organ-pipe Coral can be found in the Red Sea, the Indian Ocean and the central and western regions of the Pacific Ocean.

References: [1]

Photo credit: ©Blogie  [Top][Bottom]

Locality: Dayang Beach, Davao Del Norte, Philippines

Reblogged from : libutron
6th April 2013
What at first appears to be a blanket of fine snow on the sea bed is actually a patch of bleached coral off the northern shore of Papua New Guinea. As sea temperatures rise, this scene is becoming more and more common in coral reefs around the globe. Rising temperatures make corals expel their zooxanthellae (algae with which corals have a symbiotic relationship), leading to starvation.
This is particularly bad news because once a reef dies, it turns to rubble, making it impossible for new coral to grow on top of it. This essentially turns what was once a flourishing biodiversity mini-hotspot into a sort of ecological deadzone.
(Source) What at first appears to be a blanket of fine snow on the sea bed is actually a patch of bleached coral off the northern shore of Papua New Guinea. As sea temperatures rise, this scene is becoming more and more common in coral reefs around the globe. Rising temperatures make corals expel their zooxanthellae (algae with which corals have a symbiotic relationship), leading to starvation.
This is particularly bad news because once a reef dies, it turns to rubble, making it impossible for new coral to grow on top of it. This essentially turns what was once a flourishing biodiversity mini-hotspot into a sort of ecological deadzone.
(Source)

What at first appears to be a blanket of fine snow on the sea bed is actually a patch of bleached coral off the northern shore of Papua New Guinea. As sea temperatures rise, this scene is becoming more and more common in coral reefs around the globe. Rising temperatures make corals expel their zooxanthellae (algae with which corals have a symbiotic relationship), leading to starvation.

This is particularly bad news because once a reef dies, it turns to rubble, making it impossible for new coral to grow on top of it. This essentially turns what was once a flourishing biodiversity mini-hotspot into a sort of ecological deadzone.

(Source)

17th February 2013
The blue coral snake (Calliophis bivirgata) is sometimes colloquially referred to as the “100-pace snake” because it is said that a human can make it 100 paces away after sustaining a bite from this animal before they die. However, there are not many recorded cases of human fatalities due to this snake, which hints that the snake gets a worse reputation than it deserves. Its typical prey is other snakes.
(Photo © Tom Charlton)

The blue coral snake (Calliophis bivirgata) is sometimes colloquially referred to as the “100-pace snake” because it is said that a human can make it 100 paces away after sustaining a bite from this animal before they die. However, there are not many recorded cases of human fatalities due to this snake, which hints that the snake gets a worse reputation than it deserves. Its typical prey is other snakes.

(Photo © Tom Charlton)

29th January 2013
"Reefs in the Caribbean are experiencing a budget crisis: Corals’ production of calcium carbonate — their bony material that creates reefs — is way down, a 16-month-long investigation finds. Shallow-water reefs are in especially bad shape, with growth rates that are 30 to 40 percent of historical values. Many of these shallow sites also lack Acropora species, which are key reef-building corals that typically produce a lot of carbonate. These degraded reefs also have a lot of smothering seaweed and few critters to graze upon it, the study of 19 sites found.
The new analysis, published January 29 in Nature Communications, suggests that when the amount of live coral in a reef drops below about 10 percent, erosion begins to outpace growth of new reef structures. Many Caribbean coral reefs are approaching this tipping point, the team led by Chris Perry of the University of Exeter in England found. Ongoing assaults such as warming waters and ocean acidification may further hinder reefs’ efforts to get their budgets back in the black.”
(Story source) (Photo source)

"Reefs in the Caribbean are experiencing a budget crisis: Corals’ production of calcium carbonate — their bony material that creates reefs — is way down, a 16-month-long investigation finds. Shallow-water reefs are in especially bad shape, with growth rates that are 30 to 40 percent of historical values. Many of these shallow sites also lack Acropora species, which are key reef-building corals that typically produce a lot of carbonate. These degraded reefs also have a lot of smothering seaweed and few critters to graze upon it, the study of 19 sites found.

The new analysis, published January 29 in Nature Communications, suggests that when the amount of live coral in a reef drops below about 10 percent, erosion begins to outpace growth of new reef structures. Many Caribbean coral reefs are approaching this tipping point, the team led by Chris Perry of the University of Exeter in England found. Ongoing assaults such as warming waters and ocean acidification may further hinder reefs’ efforts to get their budgets back in the black.”

(Story source) (Photo source)

1st December 2012
The Red Sea contains arguably the richest, most biologically diverse, and most spectacular coral reefs outside Southeast Asia. Live coral cover throughout the Red Sea reefs is generally high, at about 60–70%, as is the diversity of stony and soft corals, fish (including the famous Red Sea lionfish [Pterois miles]), and other reef organisms. More than 260 different species of stony coral have been identified in the central Red Sea.
(Photo and information source) (Photo2) The Red Sea contains arguably the richest, most biologically diverse, and most spectacular coral reefs outside Southeast Asia. Live coral cover throughout the Red Sea reefs is generally high, at about 60–70%, as is the diversity of stony and soft corals, fish (including the famous Red Sea lionfish [Pterois miles]), and other reef organisms. More than 260 different species of stony coral have been identified in the central Red Sea.
(Photo and information source) (Photo2)

The Red Sea contains arguably the richest, most biologically diverse, and most spectacular coral reefs outside Southeast Asia. Live coral cover throughout the Red Sea reefs is generally high, at about 60–70%, as is the diversity of stony and soft corals, fish (including the famous Red Sea lionfish [Pterois miles]), and other reef organisms. More than 260 different species of stony coral have been identified in the central Red Sea.

(Photo and information source) (Photo2)

20th October 2012
Most of the 5000 or more sponge species are marine, although some 150 species life in fresh water. Marine sponges are abundant in all seas and at all depths, and a few even exist in brackish water. Although their embryos are free swimming, adults are always attached, usually to rocks, shells, corals, or other submerged objects.
This orange demosponge, known as the orange icing sponge (Mycale laevis), often grows beneath platelike colonies of stony corals. The large oscula of the sponge are seen at the edges of the plates. Unlike someother sponges, Mycale does not burrow into the coral skeleton and may actually protect the coral from invasion by more destructive species.
(Photo source)

Most of the 5000 or more sponge species are marine, although some 150 species life in fresh water. Marine sponges are abundant in all seas and at all depths, and a few even exist in brackish water. Although their embryos are free swimming, adults are always attached, usually to rocks, shells, corals, or other submerged objects.

This orange demosponge, known as the orange icing sponge (Mycale laevis), often grows beneath platelike colonies of stony corals. The large oscula of the sponge are seen at the edges of the plates. Unlike someother sponges, Mycale does not burrow into the coral skeleton and may actually protect the coral from invasion by more destructive species.

(Photo source)

9th October 2012
While most corals grow as colonies in tropical waters, the Devonshire cup coral (Caryophyllia smithii) is solitary and lives in temperate parts of the ocean. It grows with its cup-shaped skeleton attached to a rock or even a shipwreck. When the tentacles are expanded, these tiny corals look just like anemones, with each tapering, transparent tentacle ending in a small knob. Devonshire cup coral often occurs in a variety of corals from white or orange.
(Photo source)

While most corals grow as colonies in tropical waters, the Devonshire cup coral (Caryophyllia smithii) is solitary and lives in temperate parts of the ocean. It grows with its cup-shaped skeleton attached to a rock or even a shipwreck. When the tentacles are expanded, these tiny corals look just like anemones, with each tapering, transparent tentacle ending in a small knob. Devonshire cup coral often occurs in a variety of corals from white or orange.

(Photo source)

22nd September 2012
Animals in the phylum Cnidaria are often classified into four classes: Hydrozoa, Scyphozoa, Cubozoa, and Anthozoa. “Cnidaria” means “stinging nettle,” and animals are classified in this phylum for possessing stinging cells called nematocysts.
Hydrozoa - Siphonophores and Hydra (3,600 species) (Photo source)Scyphozoa - Jellyfish (228 species) (Photo source)Cubozoa - Box Jellies (42 species) (Photo source)Anthozoa - Sea Anemones, Corals, and Sea Pens (6,100 species) (Photo source)
Hydrozoa
Animals in the phylum Cnidaria are often classified into four classes: Hydrozoa, Scyphozoa, Cubozoa, and Anthozoa. “Cnidaria” means “stinging nettle,” and animals are classified in this phylum for possessing stinging cells called nematocysts.
Hydrozoa - Siphonophores and Hydra (3,600 species) (Photo source)Scyphozoa - Jellyfish (228 species) (Photo source)Cubozoa - Box Jellies (42 species) (Photo source)Anthozoa - Sea Anemones, Corals, and Sea Pens (6,100 species) (Photo source)
Scyphozoa
Animals in the phylum Cnidaria are often classified into four classes: Hydrozoa, Scyphozoa, Cubozoa, and Anthozoa. “Cnidaria” means “stinging nettle,” and animals are classified in this phylum for possessing stinging cells called nematocysts.
Hydrozoa - Siphonophores and Hydra (3,600 species) (Photo source)Scyphozoa - Jellyfish (228 species) (Photo source)Cubozoa - Box Jellies (42 species) (Photo source)Anthozoa - Sea Anemones, Corals, and Sea Pens (6,100 species) (Photo source)
Cubozoa
Animals in the phylum Cnidaria are often classified into four classes: Hydrozoa, Scyphozoa, Cubozoa, and Anthozoa. “Cnidaria” means “stinging nettle,” and animals are classified in this phylum for possessing stinging cells called nematocysts.
Hydrozoa - Siphonophores and Hydra (3,600 species) (Photo source)Scyphozoa - Jellyfish (228 species) (Photo source)Cubozoa - Box Jellies (42 species) (Photo source)Anthozoa - Sea Anemones, Corals, and Sea Pens (6,100 species) (Photo source)
Anthozoa

Animals in the phylum Cnidaria are often classified into four classes: Hydrozoa, Scyphozoa, Cubozoa, and Anthozoa. “Cnidaria” means “stinging nettle,” and animals are classified in this phylum for possessing stinging cells called nematocysts.

Hydrozoa - Siphonophores and Hydra (3,600 species) (Photo source)
Scyphozoa - Jellyfish (228 species) (Photo source)
Cubozoa - Box Jellies (42 species) (Photo source)
Anthozoa - Sea Anemones, Corals, and Sea Pens (6,100 species) (Photo source)

30th June 2012
Deep-sea corals were first discovered in 1869, but it took the advent of sonar and deep-sea submersibles to reveal the size and abundance of the reefs that they build. Although less well studied than their tropical counterparts, these cold-water reefs are just as rich in life. The stony corals that form deep-water reefs flourish in water temperatures of 39–55°F (4–13°C). Unlike tropical corals, they can live in total darkness because they do not rely on zooxanthellae living inside them to produce nourishment by photosynthesis in sunlight. Instead, they survive by filtering food from the water.
One of the biggest reefs—covering 38 square miles (100 square km)—was discovered during an oil-related survey of the Atlantic Frontier, norwhest of Scotland, in 1998. Lophelia pertusa is the main reef-forming coral at these reefs, called the Darwin Mounds, which lie at a depth of 3,300 ft (1,000 m). Lophelia reefs occur at similar depths on many seamounts in the Atlantic, and also in shallow cold water such as in Norway’s fjords.
Pictured is Lophelia pertusa.

Deep-sea corals were first discovered in 1869, but it took the advent of sonar and deep-sea submersibles to reveal the size and abundance of the reefs that they build. Although less well studied than their tropical counterparts, these cold-water reefs are just as rich in life. The stony corals that form deep-water reefs flourish in water temperatures of 39–55°F (4–13°C). Unlike tropical corals, they can live in total darkness because they do not rely on zooxanthellae living inside them to produce nourishment by photosynthesis in sunlight. Instead, they survive by filtering food from the water.

One of the biggest reefs—covering 38 square miles (100 square km)—was discovered during an oil-related survey of the Atlantic Frontier, norwhest of Scotland, in 1998. Lophelia pertusa is the main reef-forming coral at these reefs, called the Darwin Mounds, which lie at a depth of 3,300 ft (1,000 m). Lophelia reefs occur at similar depths on many seamounts in the Atlantic, and also in shallow cold water such as in Norway’s fjords.

Pictured is Lophelia pertusa.


I am Ashley, an incredibly introverted environmental enthusiast.
I'm studying to be a marine biologist.
I have a fierce love for all living things, a very broad sense of humor, and I'm likely too passionate for my own good.
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