42 posts tagged crustacean

9th December 2013
Perhaps the most precious of all the precious babies you’ll see on your dashboard today is the long-legged spider crab, Macropodia rostrata. They are also known as decorator crabs for their tendency to camouflage themselves with fragments of seaweed and sponges. They attach these bits to hook-shaped hairs that cover their bodies. Their method of swimming with their spindly legs is largely inefficient, but may help them move over more challenging substrate. They typically feed on small shellfish, algae, small worms, and detritus when other food is unattainable.
(Photo source(s)) Perhaps the most precious of all the precious babies you’ll see on your dashboard today is the long-legged spider crab, Macropodia rostrata. They are also known as decorator crabs for their tendency to camouflage themselves with fragments of seaweed and sponges. They attach these bits to hook-shaped hairs that cover their bodies. Their method of swimming with their spindly legs is largely inefficient, but may help them move over more challenging substrate. They typically feed on small shellfish, algae, small worms, and detritus when other food is unattainable.
(Photo source(s))

Perhaps the most precious of all the precious babies you’ll see on your dashboard today is the long-legged spider crab, Macropodia rostrata. They are also known as decorator crabs for their tendency to camouflage themselves with fragments of seaweed and sponges. They attach these bits to hook-shaped hairs that cover their bodies. Their method of swimming with their spindly legs is largely inefficient, but may help them move over more challenging substrate. They typically feed on small shellfish, algae, small worms, and detritus when other food is unattainable.

(Photo source(s))

4th November 2013
Copepods are another subclass of zooplankton crustaceans and are divided into two major groups: calanoids and cyclopoids, based on body, leg, and antennae morphology. Copepods come in a variety of body plans with varying amounts of filamentous appendages depending on the temperature and thus the density/viscosity of the water they inhabit. Their goal is to stay at the top of the water column so they can feed on their typically preferred food, phytoplankton and other zooplankton.
(Photo)

Copepods are another subclass of zooplankton crustaceans and are divided into two major groups: calanoids and cyclopoids, based on body, leg, and antennae morphology. Copepods come in a variety of body plans with varying amounts of filamentous appendages depending on the temperature and thus the density/viscosity of the water they inhabit. Their goal is to stay at the top of the water column so they can feed on their typically preferred food, phytoplankton and other zooplankton.

(Photo)

4th November 2013
Cladocerans, also known as water fleas, are a subclass of zooplankton crustaceans. The most representative genus is Daphnia, of which D. longispina (shown above) is a member. Cladocerans typically swim through the water by means of thrusting their second antennae downwards, resulting in a slow, jerky pattern of movement. Most cladocerans are filter feeders and consume only other plankton or detritus; however, some cladocerans are predaceous and trap prey with their anterior appendages, which then move the prey to their mouths to be destroyed by their sharp mandibles.
(Photo)

Cladocerans, also known as water fleas, are a subclass of zooplankton crustaceans. The most representative genus is Daphnia, of which D. longispina (shown above) is a member. Cladocerans typically swim through the water by means of thrusting their second antennae downwards, resulting in a slow, jerky pattern of movement. Most cladocerans are filter feeders and consume only other plankton or detritus; however, some cladocerans are predaceous and trap prey with their anterior appendages, which then move the prey to their mouths to be destroyed by their sharp mandibles.

(Photo)

14th July 2013
The giant mussel shrimp (Gigantocypris muelleri) lives its life entrapped entirely in its carapace. Even its seven pairs of legs are encased and nearly hidden from outside view. The brown bubbles at the center of the animal are its mirror eyes that see out through the transparent carapace. Unlike most planktonic species, the giant mussel shrimp lives at depths below 200 m, feeding on detritus that falls from the surface. When females of this species are pregnant, the eggs they carry are clearly visible through their case. Even being donned with the name “giant” mussel shrimp, these creatures rarely grow to an inch in diameter.
(Photo source)

The giant mussel shrimp (Gigantocypris muelleri) lives its life entrapped entirely in its carapace. Even its seven pairs of legs are encased and nearly hidden from outside view. The brown bubbles at the center of the animal are its mirror eyes that see out through the transparent carapace. Unlike most planktonic species, the giant mussel shrimp lives at depths below 200 m, feeding on detritus that falls from the surface. When females of this species are pregnant, the eggs they carry are clearly visible through their case. Even being donned with the name “giant” mussel shrimp, these creatures rarely grow to an inch in diameter.

(Photo source)

1st May 2013
Common terrestrial pill bug (Armadillidium vulgare)
Contrary to popular belief, pill bugs are not bugs. They are not classified into the class Insecta, and aren’t even in the same subphylum. Pill bugs are crustaceans, specifically isopods, which are more closely related to lobsters and crabs than they are to insects.
(Source)

Common terrestrial pill bug (Armadillidium vulgare)

Contrary to popular belief, pill bugs are not bugs. They are not classified into the class Insecta, and aren’t even in the same subphylum. Pill bugs are crustaceans, specifically isopods, which are more closely related to lobsters and crabs than they are to insects.

(Source)

3rd March 2013
Burrowing shrimp (family Callianassidae) make U- or Y-shaped underground networks of burrows in the fine substrate of shallow waters. They are soft-bodied crustaceans, predatory on small organisms and worms. In many species of burrowing shrimp, one of the first thoracic legs is larger than the other to aid in the creation of their subsurface homes.Pictured are a Callichirinae sp. and Callianassa californiensis.
(Source(s)) Burrowing shrimp (family Callianassidae) make U- or Y-shaped underground networks of burrows in the fine substrate of shallow waters. They are soft-bodied crustaceans, predatory on small organisms and worms. In many species of burrowing shrimp, one of the first thoracic legs is larger than the other to aid in the creation of their subsurface homes.Pictured are a Callichirinae sp. and Callianassa californiensis.
(Source(s))

Burrowing shrimp (family Callianassidae) make U- or Y-shaped underground networks of burrows in the fine substrate of shallow waters. They are soft-bodied crustaceans, predatory on small organisms and worms. In many species of burrowing shrimp, one of the first thoracic legs is larger than the other to aid in the creation of their subsurface homes.
Pictured are a Callichirinae sp. and Callianassa californiensis.

(Source(s))

8th December 2012
One of the most colorful of all the marine arthropods, the peacock mantis shrimp (Odontodactylus scyallarus) has garnered a certain amount of media attention in the scientific community for a number of reasons. Contrary to its name, it is not an actual shrimp, but it is a crustacean, in the same sub-phylum as lobsters, crabs, and shrimp. The eyes of peacock mantis shrimp are mobile, compound eyes that see not only in color but in some ultraviolet shades as well; they are the only animals in the world with hyper-spectral vision. These eyes are an important asset to the species, as they allow it to see approaching prey very easily.
When its prey is within reach, this mantis shrimp shoots out one of its enormously powerful front legs at a velocity of 120 kilometers per hour and up to 100 times the force of its own body weight. This force is generated by a joint in the legs that acts like a spring. It is strong enough to break aquarium glass and it allows this mantis shrimp to take on prey larger than itself, such as other crustaceans and mollusks. Like other mantis shrimp, they live in burrows on the ocean floor and in crevices in rocks, which can lead to their accidental transportation to aquariums.
(To hear more and see one swimming around, click here.)
Photos © Ryan Photographic One of the most colorful of all the marine arthropods, the peacock mantis shrimp (Odontodactylus scyallarus) has garnered a certain amount of media attention in the scientific community for a number of reasons. Contrary to its name, it is not an actual shrimp, but it is a crustacean, in the same sub-phylum as lobsters, crabs, and shrimp. The eyes of peacock mantis shrimp are mobile, compound eyes that see not only in color but in some ultraviolet shades as well; they are the only animals in the world with hyper-spectral vision. These eyes are an important asset to the species, as they allow it to see approaching prey very easily.
When its prey is within reach, this mantis shrimp shoots out one of its enormously powerful front legs at a velocity of 120 kilometers per hour and up to 100 times the force of its own body weight. This force is generated by a joint in the legs that acts like a spring. It is strong enough to break aquarium glass and it allows this mantis shrimp to take on prey larger than itself, such as other crustaceans and mollusks. Like other mantis shrimp, they live in burrows on the ocean floor and in crevices in rocks, which can lead to their accidental transportation to aquariums.
(To hear more and see one swimming around, click here.)
Photos © Ryan Photographic

One of the most colorful of all the marine arthropods, the peacock mantis shrimp (Odontodactylus scyallarus) has garnered a certain amount of media attention in the scientific community for a number of reasons. Contrary to its name, it is not an actual shrimp, but it is a crustacean, in the same sub-phylum as lobsters, crabs, and shrimp. The eyes of peacock mantis shrimp are mobile, compound eyes that see not only in color but in some ultraviolet shades as well; they are the only animals in the world with hyper-spectral vision. These eyes are an important asset to the species, as they allow it to see approaching prey very easily.

When its prey is within reach, this mantis shrimp shoots out one of its enormously powerful front legs at a velocity of 120 kilometers per hour and up to 100 times the force of its own body weight. This force is generated by a joint in the legs that acts like a spring. It is strong enough to break aquarium glass and it allows this mantis shrimp to take on prey larger than itself, such as other crustaceans and mollusks. Like other mantis shrimp, they live in burrows on the ocean floor and in crevices in rocks, which can lead to their accidental transportation to aquariums.

(To hear more and see one swimming around, click here.)

Photos © Ryan Photographic


I am Ashley, an incredibly introverted 21-year-old environmental enthusiast.
I'm studying to be a marine biologist, but I live near the Great Lakes rather than the ocean.
I have a fierce love for all living things, a very broad sense of humor, and I'm probably too passionate for my own good.
Herein you'll find animals (especially creepy-crawlies), nature, science, art, some of my own photography, and probably more things about my personal life than you would care to know.
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