12 posts tagged deep sea

20th December 2012
Considering most cardinalfish rarely reach longer than 10 cm in length, the deep-sea black cardinalfish (Epigonus telescopus) is an enormous cousin in the same order, but a different family than typical cardinalfish. The shallow-water cardinalfish most people are familiar with are in the family Apogonidae, but deep-sea cardinalfish belong to the family Epigonidae.
Photo © Pheobe Forrester

Considering most cardinalfish rarely reach longer than 10 cm in length, the deep-sea black cardinalfish (Epigonus telescopus) is an enormous cousin in the same order, but a different family than typical cardinalfish. The shallow-water cardinalfish most people are familiar with are in the family Apogonidae, but deep-sea cardinalfish belong to the family Epigonidae.

Photo © Pheobe Forrester

9th December 2012
The helmet jelly (Periphylla periphylla) is one of the most common deep sea jellyfish in the world and is found in every ocean except for the Arctic. Living between 1000 and 7000 meters depth, it moves up to shallower waters at night because light is toxic to the species. To avoid predation, the helmet jelly can use bioluminescence as a means of distracting predators.
Photos © Kåre Telnes The helmet jelly (Periphylla periphylla) is one of the most common deep sea jellyfish in the world and is found in every ocean except for the Arctic. Living between 1000 and 7000 meters depth, it moves up to shallower waters at night because light is toxic to the species. To avoid predation, the helmet jelly can use bioluminescence as a means of distracting predators.
Photos © Kåre Telnes

The helmet jelly (Periphylla periphylla) is one of the most common deep sea jellyfish in the world and is found in every ocean except for the Arctic. Living between 1000 and 7000 meters depth, it moves up to shallower waters at night because light is toxic to the species. To avoid predation, the helmet jelly can use bioluminescence as a means of distracting predators.

Photos © Kåre Telnes

18th October 2012
The huge, saberlike teeth of this deep-water predator, the common fangtooth (Aanoplogaster cornuta), are designed to grab and hold onto other fish that may be as big as it is. The teeth are no good for cutting or chewing and so the common fangtooth swallows its prey whole, rather like a snake does. Adults are uniformly black or dark brown in color and can live as deep as 5,000 m, but they are most common between 500–2,000 m. They hunt by themselves or in small shoals, searching for other fish to eat. Juveniles look very different from the adults and were classified as a separate species until 1955. They are light gray in color and have long spines on the head. They live in water as shallow as 50 m and feed mainly on crustaceans.
Adult females shed their eggs directly into the sea, where they develop into planktonic larvae. The juveniles take on the adult shape when they are about 8 cm long.
(Photo source)

The huge, saberlike teeth of this deep-water predator, the common fangtooth (Aanoplogaster cornuta), are designed to grab and hold onto other fish that may be as big as it is. The teeth are no good for cutting or chewing and so the common fangtooth swallows its prey whole, rather like a snake does. Adults are uniformly black or dark brown in color and can live as deep as 5,000 m, but they are most common between 500–2,000 m. They hunt by themselves or in small shoals, searching for other fish to eat. Juveniles look very different from the adults and were classified as a separate species until 1955. They are light gray in color and have long spines on the head. They live in water as shallow as 50 m and feed mainly on crustaceans.

Adult females shed their eggs directly into the sea, where they develop into planktonic larvae. The juveniles take on the adult shape when they are about 8 cm long.

(Photo source)

17th October 2012
Deep-water fish are some of the most bizarre of all fish, and Sloane’s viperfish (Chauliodus sloani) is no exception. At one end of its slender body it has a large head with huge, barbed teeth, while at the other it has a tiny forked tail. Rows of photophores run along the sides and belly and light the fish up like a night-flying airplane. During the day, it stays in deep water, but at night it migrates upward to feed where prey is more abundant. The single dorsal fin, just behind the head, has a very long first ray that can be arched over the head and may help entice prey within reach. Sloane’s viperfish spawns throughout the year. It is one of nine species of viperfish, all deep-living.
(Photo source)

Deep-water fish are some of the most bizarre of all fish, and Sloane’s viperfish (Chauliodus sloani) is no exception. At one end of its slender body it has a large head with huge, barbed teeth, while at the other it has a tiny forked tail. Rows of photophores run along the sides and belly and light the fish up like a night-flying airplane. During the day, it stays in deep water, but at night it migrates upward to feed where prey is more abundant. The single dorsal fin, just behind the head, has a very long first ray that can be arched over the head and may help entice prey within reach. Sloane’s viperfish spawns throughout the year. It is one of nine species of viperfish, all deep-living.

(Photo source)

16th October 2012
The deep ocean floor where the tripodfish (Bathypterois grallator) lives consists largely of soft mud. So, to prevent itself from sinking into the ooze while lying in wait for its prey, this fish perches on a tripod made from elongated rays of its pelvic and caudal fins. Facing in the current, it waits for small crustaceans to drift within reach, catching them in its mouth, which has a large gape. The tripodfish has very small eyes and is thought to detect its prey by feeling for tiny vibrations in the water.
(Photo source)

The deep ocean floor where the tripodfish (Bathypterois grallator) lives consists largely of soft mud. So, to prevent itself from sinking into the ooze while lying in wait for its prey, this fish perches on a tripod made from elongated rays of its pelvic and caudal fins. Facing in the current, it waits for small crustaceans to drift within reach, catching them in its mouth, which has a large gape. The tripodfish has very small eyes and is thought to detect its prey by feeling for tiny vibrations in the water.

(Photo source)

1st May 2012
Common Fangtooth (Anoplogaster cornuta)
Length: 15 - 18cm
Location: Deep temperate and tropical waters worldwide
Fun Facts: The huge, saberlike teeth of this deep-water predator are designed to grab and hold onto other fish that may be as big as it is. Juvenile common fangtooths look very different from the adults and were classified as a separate species until 1955. They are light gray in color and have long spines on the head; they live in water as shallow as 160ft (50m) and feed mainly on crustaceans.

Common Fangtooth (Anoplogaster cornuta)

Length: 15 - 18cm

Location: Deep temperate and tropical waters worldwide

Fun Facts: The huge, saberlike teeth of this deep-water predator are designed to grab and hold onto other fish that may be as big as it is. Juvenile common fangtooths look very different from the adults and were classified as a separate species until 1955. They are light gray in color and have long spines on the head; they live in water as shallow as 160ft (50m) and feed mainly on crustaceans.

16th March 2012
Hydrothermal vents, like the one pictured, are absolutely awesome for a variety of reasons. The most interesting reason, in my opinion, is that the communities around the vents are the only communities of organisms on Earth that are not dependent on sunlight or organic matter from the surface.
Chemosynthetic bacteria utilize hydrogen-sulfides emitted by the vents as energy. They are then eaten by other organisms, providing energy for the whole community.
Quick facts:• Hydrothermal vents occur where water seeps down through fissures in the central rift valley of ridges; here, the water becomes heated and rises, extracting minerals from magma.• These vents are separated into three categories:
Warm-water vents: <86° F (emit clear water)
White Smokers: between 86-662° F (emit white water; primarily barium sulfide)
Black Smokers (including the vent in the picture): >662° F (emit black water; dark metal sulfides such as iron, nickel, copper, and zinc)
• Over 300 species have been found to be members of these deep-sea hydrothermal vent communities, and the existence of these vents was only discovered in 1977!

Hydrothermal vents, like the one pictured, are absolutely awesome for a variety of reasons. The most interesting reason, in my opinion, is that the communities around the vents are the only communities of organisms on Earth that are not dependent on sunlight or organic matter from the surface.

Chemosynthetic bacteria utilize hydrogen-sulfides emitted by the vents as energy. They are then eaten by other organisms, providing energy for the whole community.

Quick facts:
• Hydrothermal vents occur where water seeps down through fissures in the central rift valley of ridges; here, the water becomes heated and rises, extracting minerals from magma.
• These vents are separated into three categories:

  • Warm-water vents: <86° F (emit clear water)
  • White Smokers: between 86-662° F (emit white water; primarily barium sulfide)
  • Black Smokers (including the vent in the picture): >662° F (emit black water; dark metal sulfides such as iron, nickel, copper, and zinc)
• Over 300 species have been found to be members of these deep-sea hydrothermal vent communities, and the existence of these vents was only discovered in 1977!
4th October 2011
rhamphotheca:

Creatures of the Deep Sea: A Fangtooth (Anoplogaster cornuta), photographed at about 2,600 feet (800 m) below the surface  of California’s Monterey Bay. This fish’s fierce appearance belies its  size — it’s only about 5 inches (12 cm) long. But thanks to its  huge mouth and teeth, a fangtooth can grab and eat fish and squid  almost its own size.
(via: Our Amazing Planet)   (Credit: © 2004 MBARI)

rhamphotheca:

Creatures of the Deep Sea: A Fangtooth (Anoplogaster cornuta), photographed at about 2,600 feet (800 m) below the surface of California’s Monterey Bay. This fish’s fierce appearance belies its size — it’s only about 5 inches (12 cm) long. But thanks to its huge mouth and teeth, a fangtooth can grab and eat fish and squid almost its own size.

(via: Our Amazing Planet)   (Credit: © 2004 MBARI)

Reblogged from : rhamphotheca
20th September 2011


ATLANTIC WOLFFISHAnarhichas lupus©Espen Rekdal

The Atlantic wolffish’s distinguishing feature, from which it gets its  common name, is its extensive teeth structure. Its dentition (teeth)  distinguishes the Atlanitic wolffish from all the other members of the  Anarhichadidae family. Both the lower and upper jaw are armed with four  to six fang-like, strong conical teeth. Behind the conical teeth in the  upper jaw, there are three rows of crushing teeth. The central row has  four pairs of molars and the outer rows house blunted conical teeth. The  lower jaw has two rows of molars behind the primary conical teeth. The  wolffish’s throat is also scattered with serrated teeth.

The Atlantic wolffish are primarily stationary fish, rarely moving from their rocky home. They are benthic dwellers,  living on the hard ocean floor, frequently seen in nooks and small  caves. They like cold water, at depths of 76 to 120 meters (250 to  400 ft). They are usually found in waters of 34-37°F (1-2°C) and  sometimes as low as 30°F (-1°C). Since they live in nearly freezing  waters, in order to keep their blood moving smoothly, their blood  contains a natural antifreeze.

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seawolf_%28fish%29



explosionsoflife:
What&#8217;s a seawolf? I&#8217;m a seawolf..!? (That&#8217;s my college&#8217;s chant.)

ATLANTIC WOLFFISH
Anarhichas lupus
©Espen Rekdal

The Atlantic wolffish’s distinguishing feature, from which it gets its common name, is its extensive teeth structure. Its dentition (teeth) distinguishes the Atlanitic wolffish from all the other members of the Anarhichadidae family. Both the lower and upper jaw are armed with four to six fang-like, strong conical teeth. Behind the conical teeth in the upper jaw, there are three rows of crushing teeth. The central row has four pairs of molars and the outer rows house blunted conical teeth. The lower jaw has two rows of molars behind the primary conical teeth. The wolffish’s throat is also scattered with serrated teeth.

The Atlantic wolffish are primarily stationary fish, rarely moving from their rocky home. They are benthic dwellers, living on the hard ocean floor, frequently seen in nooks and small caves. They like cold water, at depths of 76 to 120 meters (250 to 400 ft). They are usually found in waters of 34-37°F (1-2°C) and sometimes as low as 30°F (-1°C). Since they live in nearly freezing waters, in order to keep their blood moving smoothly, their blood contains a natural antifreeze.

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seawolf_%28fish%29

explosionsoflife:

What’s a seawolf? I’m a seawolf..!? (That’s my college’s chant.)

Reblogged from : animalworld


I am Ashley, an incredibly introverted 21-year-old environmental enthusiast.
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