2 posts tagged eagle

16th March 2013
Observations of the Eagle Nebula (the eagle shape can be seen dead-center in the top photo) have introduced new ideas into the theory of star formation. Lying in one of the dense spiral arms of the Milky Way, this is an immense stellar nursery where young stars flourish, new stars are being created, and the material and triggers exist for future star formation.
The second image is one of the most famous and iconic astronomical images. It shows the Pillars of Creation, which are towers of dense material that have resisted evaporation by radiation from local young stars. However, though a process called photoevaporation, their surfaces are slowly boiling away. These pillars are several light-years long, but are only a fraction of the entire Eagle Nebula.
(Photo source(s)) Observations of the Eagle Nebula (the eagle shape can be seen dead-center in the top photo) have introduced new ideas into the theory of star formation. Lying in one of the dense spiral arms of the Milky Way, this is an immense stellar nursery where young stars flourish, new stars are being created, and the material and triggers exist for future star formation.
The second image is one of the most famous and iconic astronomical images. It shows the Pillars of Creation, which are towers of dense material that have resisted evaporation by radiation from local young stars. However, though a process called photoevaporation, their surfaces are slowly boiling away. These pillars are several light-years long, but are only a fraction of the entire Eagle Nebula.
(Photo source(s))

Observations of the Eagle Nebula (the eagle shape can be seen dead-center in the top photo) have introduced new ideas into the theory of star formation. Lying in one of the dense spiral arms of the Milky Way, this is an immense stellar nursery where young stars flourish, new stars are being created, and the material and triggers exist for future star formation.

The second image is one of the most famous and iconic astronomical images. It shows the Pillars of Creation, which are towers of dense material that have resisted evaporation by radiation from local young stars. However, though a process called photoevaporation, their surfaces are slowly boiling away. These pillars are several light-years long, but are only a fraction of the entire Eagle Nebula.

(Photo source(s))

22nd May 2012
With a wingspan of up to three meters, the Spotted Eagle Ray (Aetobatus narinari) is a giant beauty. Unlike most other rays, the spotted eagle ray is a very active swimmer. Most of its swimming time is spent in open water, although it is also commonly seen inshore. These rays are very agile and can twist and turn to escape predatory sharks. Sometimes, small groups splash around at the surface, making spectacular leaps out of the water.

With a wingspan of up to three meters, the Spotted Eagle Ray (Aetobatus narinari) is a giant beauty. Unlike most other rays, the spotted eagle ray is a very active swimmer. Most of its swimming time is spent in open water, although it is also commonly seen inshore. These rays are very agile and can twist and turn to escape predatory sharks. Sometimes, small groups splash around at the surface, making spectacular leaps out of the water.


I am Ashley, an incredibly introverted environmental enthusiast.
I'm studying to be a marine biologist.
I have a fierce love for all living things, a very broad sense of humor, and I'm likely too passionate for my own good.
Herein you'll find animals (especially creepy-crawlies), nature, science, art, some of my own photography, and occasionally a scattering of personal posts.
I'm an avid reader and music-listener, so suggestions are always welcome (you can check out my last.fm if you're interested).
I source all of my own posts unless it's my content, in which case I tag it "personal."
But that tag is littered with a bunch of other, boring things as well, so peruse with caution.

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