29 posts tagged flower

22nd July 2013
An unidentified hymenopteran on a black-eyed Susan (Rudbeckia hirta).
EDIT: Upon further inspection, it could be a robber fly of some sort. I didn’t get a close enough look at it to tell for sure. The way it held its wings and the body shape suggested the order hymenoptera, but the big eyes and legs concentrated at the front of the body hint at diptera. An unidentified hymenopteran on a black-eyed Susan (Rudbeckia hirta).
EDIT: Upon further inspection, it could be a robber fly of some sort. I didn’t get a close enough look at it to tell for sure. The way it held its wings and the body shape suggested the order hymenoptera, but the big eyes and legs concentrated at the front of the body hint at diptera.

An unidentified hymenopteran on a black-eyed Susan (Rudbeckia hirta).

EDIT: Upon further inspection, it could be a robber fly of some sort. I didn’t get a close enough look at it to tell for sure. The way it held its wings and the body shape suggested the order hymenoptera, but the big eyes and legs concentrated at the front of the body hint at diptera.

20th February 2013
Creobotra elegans is a species of flower mantid, all of which belong to the family Hymenopodidae. The family (almost 300 species) is characterized by bright, contrasting colors that often allow the insects to be camouflaged on flowers.The nymphs of flower mantids are able to hunt their own prey immediately after their cuticles have hardened.These mantids have an ultrasonic ear that they use to detect predators, and some species have a second ear that can hear much lower frequencies. The exact purpose of this second ear is unknown, but it is probably useful for hunting or avoiding predation.
(Source)

Creobotra elegans is a species of flower mantid, all of which belong to the family Hymenopodidae. The family (almost 300 species) is characterized by bright, contrasting colors that often allow the insects to be camouflaged on flowers.
The nymphs of flower mantids are able to hunt their own prey immediately after their cuticles have hardened.
These mantids have an ultrasonic ear that they use to detect predators, and some species have a second ear that can hear much lower frequencies. The exact purpose of this second ear is unknown, but it is probably useful for hunting or avoiding predation.

(Source)


I am Ashley, an incredibly introverted 21-year-old environmental enthusiast.
I'm studying to be a marine biologist, but I live near the Great Lakes rather than the ocean.
I have a fierce love for all living things, a very broad sense of humor, and I'm probably too passionate for my own good.
Herein you'll find animals (especially creepy-crawlies), nature, science, art, some of my own photography, and probably more things about my personal life than you would care to know.
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