67 posts tagged herpetology

17th November 2013
Lucas and I went adventuring today and found a couple of northern redback salamanders (Plethodon c. cinereus). There was a bunch of broken glass in the area we found the first little guy in, so his tail somehow got cut off in the process of us finding him, but the second little cutie was fully intact.
They’re carnivorous amphibians that prey on worms, insects, spiders, and small mollusks. Considering it is where their prey is found, they spend most of their time in dark, damp forested areas, such as among leaf litter. They do not have lungs, but they breathe through their skin and mouth lining. Lucas and I went adventuring today and found a couple of northern redback salamanders (Plethodon c. cinereus). There was a bunch of broken glass in the area we found the first little guy in, so his tail somehow got cut off in the process of us finding him, but the second little cutie was fully intact.
They’re carnivorous amphibians that prey on worms, insects, spiders, and small mollusks. Considering it is where their prey is found, they spend most of their time in dark, damp forested areas, such as among leaf litter. They do not have lungs, but they breathe through their skin and mouth lining. Lucas and I went adventuring today and found a couple of northern redback salamanders (Plethodon c. cinereus). There was a bunch of broken glass in the area we found the first little guy in, so his tail somehow got cut off in the process of us finding him, but the second little cutie was fully intact.
They’re carnivorous amphibians that prey on worms, insects, spiders, and small mollusks. Considering it is where their prey is found, they spend most of their time in dark, damp forested areas, such as among leaf litter. They do not have lungs, but they breathe through their skin and mouth lining. Lucas and I went adventuring today and found a couple of northern redback salamanders (Plethodon c. cinereus). There was a bunch of broken glass in the area we found the first little guy in, so his tail somehow got cut off in the process of us finding him, but the second little cutie was fully intact.
They’re carnivorous amphibians that prey on worms, insects, spiders, and small mollusks. Considering it is where their prey is found, they spend most of their time in dark, damp forested areas, such as among leaf litter. They do not have lungs, but they breathe through their skin and mouth lining.

Lucas and I went adventuring today and found a couple of northern redback salamanders (Plethodon c. cinereus). There was a bunch of broken glass in the area we found the first little guy in, so his tail somehow got cut off in the process of us finding him, but the second little cutie was fully intact.

They’re carnivorous amphibians that prey on worms, insects, spiders, and small mollusks. Considering it is where their prey is found, they spend most of their time in dark, damp forested areas, such as among leaf litter. They do not have lungs, but they breathe through their skin and mouth lining.

28th October 2013
The blotched boulder-frog (Cophixalus petrophilus), a species newly found from the Cape Melville rainforest, lives deep in the labyrinth of a boulder-field where conditions are cool and moist during the dry season, allowing female frogs to lay their eggs in wet cracks in the rocks. In the absence of water, the tadpole develops within the egg and a fully formed frog hatches out.
(Read more)

The blotched boulder-frog (Cophixalus petrophilus), a species newly found from the Cape Melville rainforest, lives deep in the labyrinth of a boulder-field where conditions are cool and moist during the dry season, allowing female frogs to lay their eggs in wet cracks in the rocks. In the absence of water, the tadpole develops within the egg and a fully formed frog hatches out.

(Read more)

28th October 2013
"Lost World" Discovered in Remote Australia
Three new species were found on a recent expedition to the Cape Melville mountain range in northeastern Australia. The newly found Cape Melville leaf-tail gecko (Saltuarius eximius), Cape Melville shade skink (Saproscincus saltus), and blotched boulder-frog (Cophixalus petrophilus) are three herps previously undiscovered by science among several other animals found on the expedition that may be new to science. These species are expected to have existed in isolation for millions of years.
Read the whole story here. "Lost World" Discovered in Remote Australia
Three new species were found on a recent expedition to the Cape Melville mountain range in northeastern Australia. The newly found Cape Melville leaf-tail gecko (Saltuarius eximius), Cape Melville shade skink (Saproscincus saltus), and blotched boulder-frog (Cophixalus petrophilus) are three herps previously undiscovered by science among several other animals found on the expedition that may be new to science. These species are expected to have existed in isolation for millions of years.
Read the whole story here.

"Lost World" Discovered in Remote Australia

Three new species were found on a recent expedition to the Cape Melville mountain range in northeastern Australia. The newly found Cape Melville leaf-tail gecko (Saltuarius eximius), Cape Melville shade skink (Saproscincus saltus), and blotched boulder-frog (Cophixalus petrophilus) are three herps previously undiscovered by science among several other animals found on the expedition that may be new to science. These species are expected to have existed in isolation for millions of years.

Read the whole story here.

24th June 2013
Black rat snake (Pantherophis obsoletus), commonly found in the northeastern US. They are the largest species of snake in New York and can reach lengths of over two meters, though that is rare. Thankfully, they are nonvenomous. When they feel threatened, like this one did, they shake their tails (in a manner similar to rattlesnakes) in dead leaves, making a rattling noise to ward off predators. Black rat snake (Pantherophis obsoletus), commonly found in the northeastern US. They are the largest species of snake in New York and can reach lengths of over two meters, though that is rare. Thankfully, they are nonvenomous. When they feel threatened, like this one did, they shake their tails (in a manner similar to rattlesnakes) in dead leaves, making a rattling noise to ward off predators.

Black rat snake (Pantherophis obsoletus), commonly found in the northeastern US. They are the largest species of snake in New York and can reach lengths of over two meters, though that is rare. Thankfully, they are nonvenomous. When they feel threatened, like this one did, they shake their tails (in a manner similar to rattlesnakes) in dead leaves, making a rattling noise to ward off predators.


I am Ashley, an incredibly introverted environmental enthusiast.
I'm studying to be a marine biologist.
I have a fierce love for all living things, a very broad sense of humor, and I'm likely too passionate for my own good.
Herein you'll find animals (especially creepy-crawlies), nature, science, art, some of my own photography, and occasionally a scattering of personal posts.
I'm an avid reader and music-listener, so suggestions are always welcome (you can check out my last.fm if you're interested).
I source all of my own posts unless it's my content, in which case I tag it "personal."
But that tag is littered with a bunch of other, boring things as well, so peruse with caution.

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