28 posts tagged national geographic

28th October 2013
"Lost World" Discovered in Remote Australia
Three new species were found on a recent expedition to the Cape Melville mountain range in northeastern Australia. The newly found Cape Melville leaf-tail gecko (Saltuarius eximius), Cape Melville shade skink (Saproscincus saltus), and blotched boulder-frog (Cophixalus petrophilus) are three herps previously undiscovered by science among several other animals found on the expedition that may be new to science. These species are expected to have existed in isolation for millions of years.
Read the whole story here. "Lost World" Discovered in Remote Australia
Three new species were found on a recent expedition to the Cape Melville mountain range in northeastern Australia. The newly found Cape Melville leaf-tail gecko (Saltuarius eximius), Cape Melville shade skink (Saproscincus saltus), and blotched boulder-frog (Cophixalus petrophilus) are three herps previously undiscovered by science among several other animals found on the expedition that may be new to science. These species are expected to have existed in isolation for millions of years.
Read the whole story here.

"Lost World" Discovered in Remote Australia

Three new species were found on a recent expedition to the Cape Melville mountain range in northeastern Australia. The newly found Cape Melville leaf-tail gecko (Saltuarius eximius), Cape Melville shade skink (Saproscincus saltus), and blotched boulder-frog (Cophixalus petrophilus) are three herps previously undiscovered by science among several other animals found on the expedition that may be new to science. These species are expected to have existed in isolation for millions of years.

Read the whole story here.

23rd January 2013
The earth is now home to over seven billion humans. If you find that hard to fathom, try grasping how many have ever walked the planet.That’s what American demographer Carl Haub wanted to find out when, in 1975, he heard someone say that 75 percent of the people who’d ever been born were alive at that time.Dubious, he set out to disprove it, taking two main things into account: (1) the assumed dawn of humanity and (2) average populations at different periods of time.Using 50,000 B.C. as his starting point, Haub applied crude birth-rates—the number of annual births per thousand people—to each population set, then added them. His estimate? In 1975, 103 billion people had lived, but only 4 percent of them were alive at that time.Applied to our current population, says Haub, those numbers are around 108 billion, and 6.4 percent. Mind-boggling, indeed.
Information and graphic from National Geographic 

The earth is now home to over seven billion humans. If you find that hard to fathom, try grasping how many have ever walked the planet.
That’s what American demographer Carl Haub wanted to find out when, in 1975, he heard someone say that 75 percent of the people who’d ever been born were alive at that time.
Dubious, he set out to disprove it, taking two main things into account: (1) the assumed dawn of humanity and (2) average populations at different periods of time.
Using 50,000 B.C. as his starting point, Haub applied crude birth-rates—the number of annual births per thousand people—to each population set, then added them. His estimate? In 1975, 103 billion people had lived, but only 4 percent of them were alive at that time.
Applied to our current population, says Haub, those numbers are around 108 billion, and 6.4 percent. Mind-boggling, indeed.

Information and graphic from National Geographic 

7th May 2012
A giant spider crab is illuminated by the lights of a submersible. Protected from some predators by its hard exoskeleton, the creature—which can grow to ten feet (three meters) wide—can also blend in with the ocean floor. Under deeper cover, it can disappear beneath the sponges and other marine life it uses to adorn its shell.
Photograph by Emory Kristof

A giant spider crab is illuminated by the lights of a submersible. Protected from some predators by its hard exoskeleton, the creature—which can grow to ten feet (three meters) wide—can also blend in with the ocean floor. Under deeper cover, it can disappear beneath the sponges and other marine life it uses to adorn its shell.

Photograph by Emory Kristof

6th May 2012
The world’s largest creatures reside in the ocean, and its depths are home to unusual species whose surprising proportions are unknown on land.
Here, an underwater view captures the billowing tentacles of a lion’s mane jellyfish. The most potent species of jellyfish, the lion’s mane can reach a diameter of 6.6 feet (2 meters) with tentacles topping 49 feet (15 meters).
Photograph by Paul Nicklen, National Geographic

The world’s largest creatures reside in the ocean, and its depths are home to unusual species whose surprising proportions are unknown on land.

Here, an underwater view captures the billowing tentacles of a lion’s mane jellyfish. The most potent species of jellyfish, the lion’s mane can reach a diameter of 6.6 feet (2 meters) with tentacles topping 49 feet (15 meters).

Photograph by Paul Nicklen, National Geographic

1st May 2012
Fanged vampire fish, or payara (Hydrolycus scomberoides), are offered at a market in Pevas, Peru, on the Amazon River. This fearsome, little-known fish is prized for its meat in the Amazon and Orinoco basins.
Vampire fish prey primarily on smaller fish, especially piranhas, which they impale with their long, sharp fangs. The intimidating teeth can grow up to six inches long.
Photograph by Peter McBride, National Geographic

Fanged vampire fish, or payara (Hydrolycus scomberoides), are offered at a market in Pevas, Peru, on the Amazon River. This fearsome, little-known fish is prized for its meat in the Amazon and Orinoco basins.

Vampire fish prey primarily on smaller fish, especially piranhas, which they impale with their long, sharp fangs. The intimidating teeth can grow up to six inches long.

Photograph by Peter McBride, National Geographic

1st May 2012
A mata mata (Chelus fimbriatus) is a freshwater turtle that inhabits the Amazon and Orinoco basins in South America. The bizarre turtles are entirely aquatic, although they prefer shallow, stagnant water, where they can easily reach their head out of water to breathe.
The mata mata can grow quite large, up to 33 pounds (15 kilograms). They feed on invertebrates and fish and aren’t dangerous to people, despite their appearance.
Mata mata are fairly sensitive to water quality, both in captivity and in the wild, so they can be harmed by pollutants.
Photograph by Alessandro Mancini, Alamy

A mata mata (Chelus fimbriatus) is a freshwater turtle that inhabits the Amazon and Orinoco basins in South America. The bizarre turtles are entirely aquatic, although they prefer shallow, stagnant water, where they can easily reach their head out of water to breathe.

The mata mata can grow quite large, up to 33 pounds (15 kilograms). They feed on invertebrates and fish and aren’t dangerous to people, despite their appearance.

Mata mata are fairly sensitive to water quality, both in captivity and in the wild, so they can be harmed by pollutants.

Photograph by Alessandro Mancini, Alamy


I am Ashley, an incredibly introverted 21-year-old environmental enthusiast.
I'm studying to be a marine biologist, but I live near the Great Lakes rather than the ocean.
I have a fierce love for all living things, a very broad sense of humor, and I'm probably too passionate for my own good.
Herein you'll find animals (especially creepy-crawlies), nature, science, art, some of my own photography, and probably more things about my personal life than you would care to know.
I'm an avid reader and music-listener, so suggestions are always welcome (you can check out my last.fm if you're interested).
I source all of my own posts unless it's my content, in which case I tag it "personal."
But that tag is littered with a bunch of other things as well, so peruse with caution.

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