875 posts tagged nature

21st March 2014
Cursed with the face of a B-list horror movie monster, the common stargazer (Kathetostoma laeve) has its eyes situated on the top of its head. This allows it to bury itself in the sand and still be able to see prey swimming overhead. Armed with sharp teeth and two venomous spines (one behind each gill cover), they are formidable predators and are unafraid to snap at anything that may disturb them. They can grow up to 75 cm in length and typically prey upon passing fish and crustaceans.
Photo source(s) Cursed with the face of a B-list horror movie monster, the common stargazer (Kathetostoma laeve) has its eyes situated on the top of its head. This allows it to bury itself in the sand and still be able to see prey swimming overhead. Armed with sharp teeth and two venomous spines (one behind each gill cover), they are formidable predators and are unafraid to snap at anything that may disturb them. They can grow up to 75 cm in length and typically prey upon passing fish and crustaceans.
Photo source(s)

Cursed with the face of a B-list horror movie monster, the common stargazer (Kathetostoma laeve) has its eyes situated on the top of its head. This allows it to bury itself in the sand and still be able to see prey swimming overhead. Armed with sharp teeth and two venomous spines (one behind each gill cover), they are formidable predators and are unafraid to snap at anything that may disturb them. They can grow up to 75 cm in length and typically prey upon passing fish and crustaceans.

Photo source(s)

20th March 2014
Growing as tall as 30 cm (1 ft), the plumose anemone (Metridium senile) resembles an overzealous shag carpet coming out of a mushroom stem. Fragments of this stem can grow into new anemones.Though it is most commonly found in either orange or white, it can also be yellow, red, brown, or gray. They typically live on pier pilings or shipwrecks, extending out into the current to allow their tentacles to capture prey. Large specimens may have as many as 1000 tentacles on a single head.
© Kåre Telnes Growing as tall as 30 cm (1 ft), the plumose anemone (Metridium senile) resembles an overzealous shag carpet coming out of a mushroom stem. Fragments of this stem can grow into new anemones.Though it is most commonly found in either orange or white, it can also be yellow, red, brown, or gray. They typically live on pier pilings or shipwrecks, extending out into the current to allow their tentacles to capture prey. Large specimens may have as many as 1000 tentacles on a single head.
© Kåre Telnes

Growing as tall as 30 cm (1 ft), the plumose anemone (Metridium senile) resembles an overzealous shag carpet coming out of a mushroom stem. Fragments of this stem can grow into new anemones.
Though it is most commonly found in either orange or white, it can also be yellow, red, brown, or gray. They typically live on pier pilings or shipwrecks, extending out into the current to allow their tentacles to capture prey. Large specimens may have as many as 1000 tentacles on a single head.

© Kåre Telnes

17th March 2014
While most fish do not show parental care for their offspring, some fish (such as the mouth-brooding cichlid shown here) go above and beyond to protect their young. This protective behavior is typically exhibited by males of the species and is characterized by keeping the eggs safely within their mouths until they hatch as well as allowing the recently-hatched young to take shelter there.
Because young fish don’t always know what organisms are a threat to them, adults develop fin-flickering patterns that the young quickly learn to identify. When mom or dad wiggle their fins in a certain way, larval fish know a predator is nearby and to take cover in their parent’s mouth.
(Photo source)

While most fish do not show parental care for their offspring, some fish (such as the mouth-brooding cichlid shown here) go above and beyond to protect their young. This protective behavior is typically exhibited by males of the species and is characterized by keeping the eggs safely within their mouths until they hatch as well as allowing the recently-hatched young to take shelter there.

Because young fish don’t always know what organisms are a threat to them, adults develop fin-flickering patterns that the young quickly learn to identify. When mom or dad wiggle their fins in a certain way, larval fish know a predator is nearby and to take cover in their parent’s mouth.

(Photo source)


I am Ashley, an incredibly introverted 21-year-old environmental enthusiast.
I'm studying to be a marine biologist, but I live near the Great Lakes rather than the ocean.
I have a fierce love for all living things, a very broad sense of humor, and I'm probably too passionate for my own good.
Herein you'll find animals (especially creepy-crawlies), nature, science, art, some of my own photography, and probably more things about my personal life than you would care to know.
I'm an avid reader and music-listener, so suggestions are always welcome (you can check out my last.fm if you're interested).
I source all of my own posts unless it's my content, in which case I tag it "personal."
But that tag is littered with a bunch of other things as well, so peruse with caution.

Powered by Tumblr, Cutout Theme by Paul Mackenzie