7 posts tagged new species

28th October 2013
The blotched boulder-frog (Cophixalus petrophilus), a species newly found from the Cape Melville rainforest, lives deep in the labyrinth of a boulder-field where conditions are cool and moist during the dry season, allowing female frogs to lay their eggs in wet cracks in the rocks. In the absence of water, the tadpole develops within the egg and a fully formed frog hatches out.
(Read more)

The blotched boulder-frog (Cophixalus petrophilus), a species newly found from the Cape Melville rainforest, lives deep in the labyrinth of a boulder-field where conditions are cool and moist during the dry season, allowing female frogs to lay their eggs in wet cracks in the rocks. In the absence of water, the tadpole develops within the egg and a fully formed frog hatches out.

(Read more)

28th October 2013
"Lost World" Discovered in Remote Australia
Three new species were found on a recent expedition to the Cape Melville mountain range in northeastern Australia. The newly found Cape Melville leaf-tail gecko (Saltuarius eximius), Cape Melville shade skink (Saproscincus saltus), and blotched boulder-frog (Cophixalus petrophilus) are three herps previously undiscovered by science among several other animals found on the expedition that may be new to science. These species are expected to have existed in isolation for millions of years.
Read the whole story here. "Lost World" Discovered in Remote Australia
Three new species were found on a recent expedition to the Cape Melville mountain range in northeastern Australia. The newly found Cape Melville leaf-tail gecko (Saltuarius eximius), Cape Melville shade skink (Saproscincus saltus), and blotched boulder-frog (Cophixalus petrophilus) are three herps previously undiscovered by science among several other animals found on the expedition that may be new to science. These species are expected to have existed in isolation for millions of years.
Read the whole story here.

"Lost World" Discovered in Remote Australia

Three new species were found on a recent expedition to the Cape Melville mountain range in northeastern Australia. The newly found Cape Melville leaf-tail gecko (Saltuarius eximius), Cape Melville shade skink (Saproscincus saltus), and blotched boulder-frog (Cophixalus petrophilus) are three herps previously undiscovered by science among several other animals found on the expedition that may be new to science. These species are expected to have existed in isolation for millions of years.

Read the whole story here.

6th April 2012
Four new species of chameleon were found on the African island of Madagascar. With an average adult length of of just over an inch (2.9cm) from snout to tail, these are some of the tiniest reptiles in the world.Scientists think the diminutive new chameleon species might represent extreme cases of island dwarfism, whereby organisms shrink in size due to limited resources on islands.Scientists think Brookesia micra (juvenile shown in top picture) might have achieved its small size through a “double” island dwarfism effect, in which the dwarf species Brookesia minima on the Madagascan resort island of Nosy Be found its way to an islet, Nosy Hara, where it shrank even further.Brookesia desperata peers at a photographer through widely spaced eyes in the second photo.The small sizes of the four new chameleon species make them especially vulnerable to habitat destruction, and some of their names were chosen to reflect this. The latter part of B. desperata’s name, for example, means “desperate” in Latin.
(read more) Four new species of chameleon were found on the African island of Madagascar. With an average adult length of of just over an inch (2.9cm) from snout to tail, these are some of the tiniest reptiles in the world.Scientists think the diminutive new chameleon species might represent extreme cases of island dwarfism, whereby organisms shrink in size due to limited resources on islands.Scientists think Brookesia micra (juvenile shown in top picture) might have achieved its small size through a “double” island dwarfism effect, in which the dwarf species Brookesia minima on the Madagascan resort island of Nosy Be found its way to an islet, Nosy Hara, where it shrank even further.Brookesia desperata peers at a photographer through widely spaced eyes in the second photo.The small sizes of the four new chameleon species make them especially vulnerable to habitat destruction, and some of their names were chosen to reflect this. The latter part of B. desperata’s name, for example, means “desperate” in Latin.
(read more)

Four new species of chameleon were found on the African island of Madagascar. With an average adult length of of just over an inch (2.9cm) from snout to tail, these are some of the tiniest reptiles in the world.
Scientists think the diminutive new chameleon species might represent extreme cases of island dwarfism, whereby organisms shrink in size due to limited resources on islands.
Scientists think Brookesia micra (juvenile shown in top picture) might have achieved its small size through a “double” island dwarfism effect, in which the dwarf species Brookesia minima on the Madagascan resort island of Nosy Be found its way to an islet, Nosy Hara, where it shrank even further.
Brookesia desperata peers at a photographer through widely spaced eyes in the second photo.
The small sizes of the four new chameleon species make them especially vulnerable to habitat destruction, and some of their names were chosen to reflect this. The latter part of B. desperata’s name, for example, means “desperate” in Latin.

(read more)

18th March 2012
On a foray into the wilds of Staten Island in 2009, Jeremy A. Feinberg, a doctoral candidate in ecology and evolution at Rutgers University, heard something strange as he listened for the distinctive mating call of the southern leopard frog — usually a repetitive chuckle. But this was a single cluck.
“I started hearing these calls, and I realized they were really distinct,” Mr. Feinberg said.
Three years later, Mr. Feinberg and four other scientists who joined him in multiple field and laboratory studies, are finally comfortable making their declaration: a new species of leopard frog — as yet unnamed — has been identified in New York City and a number of surrounding counties.
(Read more)

On a foray into the wilds of Staten Island in 2009, Jeremy A. Feinberg, a doctoral candidate in ecology and evolution at Rutgers University, heard something strange as he listened for the distinctive mating call of the southern leopard frog — usually a repetitive chuckle. But this was a single cluck.

“I started hearing these calls, and I realized they were really distinct,” Mr. Feinberg said.

Three years later, Mr. Feinberg and four other scientists who joined him in multiple field and laboratory studies, are finally comfortable making their declaration: a new species of leopard frog — as yet unnamed — has been identified in New York City and a number of surrounding counties.

(Read more)


I am Ashley, an incredibly introverted 21-year-old environmental enthusiast.
I'm studying to be a marine biologist, but I live near the Great Lakes rather than the ocean.
I have a fierce love for all living things, a very broad sense of humor, and I'm probably too passionate for my own good.
Herein you'll find animals (especially creepy-crawlies), nature, science, art, some of my own photography, and probably more things about my personal life than you would care to know.
I'm an avid reader and music-listener, so suggestions are always welcome (you can check out my last.fm if you're interested).
I source all of my own posts unless it's my content, in which case I tag it "personal."
But that tag is littered with a bunch of other things as well, so peruse with caution.

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