5th December 2012
Pfeffer’s Flamboyant Cuttlefish (Metasepia pfefferi) is a poisonous cuttlefish found off the coast of Australia and other Indo-Pacific waters. True to its name, this cuttlefish sports a variety of colors. It is one of only three cephalopods known to be toxic to humans.

Photo © Teresa Zubi

Pfeffer’s Flamboyant Cuttlefish (Metasepia pfefferi) is a poisonous cuttlefish found off the coast of Australia and other Indo-Pacific waters. True to its name, this cuttlefish sports a variety of colors. It is one of only three cephalopods known to be toxic to humans.

Photo © Teresa Zubi

8th October 2011
oceansoftheworld:

(Photo by Neil Liddle)
Pfeffer’s flamboyant cuttlefish, (Metasepia pfefferi) displays stunning changing colors and patterns and actually “walks”  along the bottom of the sea (the only one known to do so). M. pfefferi has a maximum mantle length of 6-8 cm with 3 pairs of flap-like fleshy papillae (fleshy nipple-like  protuberances) and a V-shaped ventral (underside) fleshy ridge. This  cuttlefish also has large violet oblique V-shaped patches on both sides  of the dorsal mantle. Papillae are also present over the eyes. The  papillae are used for camouflage to break up the outline of the  cuttlefish. Pfeffer’s flamboyant cuttlefish undergoes incredible color changes  possible due to three types of structures contained within its skin,  called chromatophores, leucophores and iridophores, which are small  structures filled with colored ink which can be rapidly expanded and  contracted to communicate or are used as camouflage within its habitat.  These structures allow the cuttlefish to rapidly reflect a myriad of  colors and change the textures of their skin.
(Source)

oceansoftheworld:

(Photo by Neil Liddle)

Pfeffer’s flamboyant cuttlefish, (Metasepia pfefferi) displays stunning changing colors and patterns and actually “walks” along the bottom of the sea (the only one known to do so). M. pfefferi has a maximum mantle length of 6-8 cm with 3 pairs of flap-like fleshy papillae (fleshy nipple-like protuberances) and a V-shaped ventral (underside) fleshy ridge. This cuttlefish also has large violet oblique V-shaped patches on both sides of the dorsal mantle. Papillae are also present over the eyes. The papillae are used for camouflage to break up the outline of the cuttlefish. Pfeffer’s flamboyant cuttlefish undergoes incredible color changes possible due to three types of structures contained within its skin, called chromatophores, leucophores and iridophores, which are small structures filled with colored ink which can be rapidly expanded and contracted to communicate or are used as camouflage within its habitat. These structures allow the cuttlefish to rapidly reflect a myriad of colors and change the textures of their skin.

(Source)

Reblogged from : oceansoftheworld


I am Ashley, an incredibly introverted 21-year-old environmental enthusiast.
I'm studying to be a marine biologist, but I live near the Great Lakes rather than the ocean.
I have a fierce love for all living things, a very broad sense of humor, and I'm probably too passionate for my own good.
Herein you'll find animals (especially creepy-crawlies), nature, science, art, some of my own photography, and probably more things about my personal life than you would care to know.
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