7 posts tagged salamander

17th November 2013
Lucas and I went adventuring today and found a couple of northern redback salamanders (Plethodon c. cinereus). There was a bunch of broken glass in the area we found the first little guy in, so his tail somehow got cut off in the process of us finding him, but the second little cutie was fully intact.
They’re carnivorous amphibians that prey on worms, insects, spiders, and small mollusks. Considering it is where their prey is found, they spend most of their time in dark, damp forested areas, such as among leaf litter. They do not have lungs, but they breathe through their skin and mouth lining. Lucas and I went adventuring today and found a couple of northern redback salamanders (Plethodon c. cinereus). There was a bunch of broken glass in the area we found the first little guy in, so his tail somehow got cut off in the process of us finding him, but the second little cutie was fully intact.
They’re carnivorous amphibians that prey on worms, insects, spiders, and small mollusks. Considering it is where their prey is found, they spend most of their time in dark, damp forested areas, such as among leaf litter. They do not have lungs, but they breathe through their skin and mouth lining. Lucas and I went adventuring today and found a couple of northern redback salamanders (Plethodon c. cinereus). There was a bunch of broken glass in the area we found the first little guy in, so his tail somehow got cut off in the process of us finding him, but the second little cutie was fully intact.
They’re carnivorous amphibians that prey on worms, insects, spiders, and small mollusks. Considering it is where their prey is found, they spend most of their time in dark, damp forested areas, such as among leaf litter. They do not have lungs, but they breathe through their skin and mouth lining. Lucas and I went adventuring today and found a couple of northern redback salamanders (Plethodon c. cinereus). There was a bunch of broken glass in the area we found the first little guy in, so his tail somehow got cut off in the process of us finding him, but the second little cutie was fully intact.
They’re carnivorous amphibians that prey on worms, insects, spiders, and small mollusks. Considering it is where their prey is found, they spend most of their time in dark, damp forested areas, such as among leaf litter. They do not have lungs, but they breathe through their skin and mouth lining.

Lucas and I went adventuring today and found a couple of northern redback salamanders (Plethodon c. cinereus). There was a bunch of broken glass in the area we found the first little guy in, so his tail somehow got cut off in the process of us finding him, but the second little cutie was fully intact.

They’re carnivorous amphibians that prey on worms, insects, spiders, and small mollusks. Considering it is where their prey is found, they spend most of their time in dark, damp forested areas, such as among leaf litter. They do not have lungs, but they breathe through their skin and mouth lining.

5th February 2013
The crocodile newt, also known as the mandarin salamander (Tylototriton verrucosus), is lined and dotted with bright orange markings that let other animals know not to eat it. When attacked, glands in the crocodile newt’s skin exude a distasteful secretion. Typically land-dwelling and nocturnal, this amphibian hunts at night for invertebrates. During monsoon season, they migrate to breeding ponds to lay their eggs before returning to their terrestrial environments.
(Photo source(s)) The crocodile newt, also known as the mandarin salamander (Tylototriton verrucosus), is lined and dotted with bright orange markings that let other animals know not to eat it. When attacked, glands in the crocodile newt’s skin exude a distasteful secretion. Typically land-dwelling and nocturnal, this amphibian hunts at night for invertebrates. During monsoon season, they migrate to breeding ponds to lay their eggs before returning to their terrestrial environments.
(Photo source(s))

The crocodile newt, also known as the mandarin salamander (Tylototriton verrucosus), is lined and dotted with bright orange markings that let other animals know not to eat it. When attacked, glands in the crocodile newt’s skin exude a distasteful secretion. Typically land-dwelling and nocturnal, this amphibian hunts at night for invertebrates. During monsoon season, they migrate to breeding ponds to lay their eggs before returning to their terrestrial environments.

(Photo source(s))

26th April 2012
The Japanese Giant Salamander is one big amphibian. They can reach a length of almost five feet and weigh up to 65lbs. Eating isn’t a priority to these creatures because of their slow metabolisms, so they can go for weeks without nourishment if they need to, but when they do eat, it’s a sight to see. They catch fish, smaller salamanders, worms, insects, crayfish and snails with a rapid sideways snap of the mouth.
(source)

The Japanese Giant Salamander is one big amphibian. They can reach a length of almost five feet and weigh up to 65lbs. Eating isn’t a priority to these creatures because of their slow metabolisms, so they can go for weeks without nourishment if they need to, but when they do eat, it’s a sight to see. They catch fish, smaller salamanders, worms, insects, crayfish and snails with a rapid sideways snap of the mouth.

(source)

27th September 2011
rhamphotheca:

Axolotls (Ambystoma mexicanum)
 
… a neotenic salamander, closely related to the Tiger Salamander. Larvae of this species fail to undergo metamorphosis, so the adults remain aquatic and gilled. The species originates from numerous lakes, such as Lake Xochimilco underlying Mexico City. Axolotls are used extensively in scientific research due to their ability to regenerate limbs.
As of 2010, wild axolotls are near extinction due to urbanization in Mexico City and polluted waters. Nonnative fish such as African tilapia and Asian carp have also recently been introduced to the waters. These new fish have been eating the axolotls’ young, as well as its primary source of food. The axolotl is currently on the International Union for Conservation of Nature’s annual Red List of threatened species...
(read more: Wikipedia)    (photo: LoKiLeCh)

rhamphotheca:

Axolotls (Ambystoma mexicanum)

… a neotenic salamander, closely related to the Tiger Salamander. Larvae of this species fail to undergo metamorphosis, so the adults remain aquatic and gilled. The species originates from numerous lakes, such as Lake Xochimilco underlying Mexico City. Axolotls are used extensively in scientific research due to their ability to regenerate limbs.

As of 2010, wild axolotls are near extinction due to urbanization in Mexico City and polluted waters. Nonnative fish such as African tilapia and Asian carp have also recently been introduced to the waters. These new fish have been eating the axolotls’ young, as well as its primary source of food. The axolotl is currently on the International Union for Conservation of Nature’s annual Red List of threatened species...

(read more: Wikipedia)    (photo: LoKiLeCh)
Reblogged from : rhamphotheca


I am Ashley, an incredibly introverted environmental enthusiast.
I'm studying to be a marine biologist.
I have a fierce love for all living things, a very broad sense of humor, and I'm likely too passionate for my own good.
Herein you'll find animals (especially creepy-crawlies), nature, science, art, some of my own photography, and occasionally a scattering of personal posts.
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