5 posts tagged sand

2nd February 2013
The beaked sandfish (Gonorhynchus gonorhynchus) is adapted to spend its days in the substrate on the seabed, hiding in the sand or mud. They leave the safety of their hiding places at night to feed on invertebrates that live on the seabed. Because they lack teeth, their mouths are surrounded by papillae (sensory flaps) that help it to find food. As the second photo depicts, they have excellent camouflage that allows them to blend in almost perfectly with the sand along the ocean floor, which has benefits for hunting down prey and for avoiding predators.
(Photos © RyanPhotographic) The beaked sandfish (Gonorhynchus gonorhynchus) is adapted to spend its days in the substrate on the seabed, hiding in the sand or mud. They leave the safety of their hiding places at night to feed on invertebrates that live on the seabed. Because they lack teeth, their mouths are surrounded by papillae (sensory flaps) that help it to find food. As the second photo depicts, they have excellent camouflage that allows them to blend in almost perfectly with the sand along the ocean floor, which has benefits for hunting down prey and for avoiding predators.
(Photos © RyanPhotographic)

The beaked sandfish (Gonorhynchus gonorhynchus) is adapted to spend its days in the substrate on the seabed, hiding in the sand or mud. They leave the safety of their hiding places at night to feed on invertebrates that live on the seabed. Because they lack teeth, their mouths are surrounded by papillae (sensory flaps) that help it to find food. As the second photo depicts, they have excellent camouflage that allows them to blend in almost perfectly with the sand along the ocean floor, which has benefits for hunting down prey and for avoiding predators.

(Photos © RyanPhotographic)

28th July 2012
Surviving on fluids in its food and very little additional water, the blunt-clawed sand cat (Felis margarita) digs well for its main prey of gerbils and similar rodents, as well as an occasional lizard or snake. It also excavates a den for daytime shelter. The average litter of three grows quickly and may be independent in just six months.
Photograph © Johanna Leguerre

Surviving on fluids in its food and very little additional water, the blunt-clawed sand cat (Felis margarita) digs well for its main prey of gerbils and similar rodents, as well as an occasional lizard or snake. It also excavates a den for daytime shelter. The average litter of three grows quickly and may be independent in just six months.

Photograph © Johanna Leguerre


I am Ashley, an incredibly introverted 21-year-old environmental enthusiast.
I'm studying to be a marine biologist, but I live near the Great Lakes rather than the ocean.
I have a fierce love for all living things, a very broad sense of humor, and I'm probably too passionate for my own good.
Herein you'll find animals (especially creepy-crawlies), nature, science, art, some of my own photography, and probably more things about my personal life than you would care to know.
I'm an avid reader and music-listener, so suggestions are always welcome (you can check out my last.fm if you're interested).
I source all of my own posts unless it's my content, in which case I tag it "personal."
But that tag is littered with a bunch of other things as well, so peruse with caution.

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