42 posts tagged shark

12th July 2013
The velvet belly lanternshark (Etmopterus spinax) searches for its prey—fish and squid—in the darkness. While doing so, its belly is illuminated by small, but bright photophores. As it’s a deep water fish, this adaptation helps the velvet belly lanternshark’s body be camouflaged against the faint light coming down from the surface so that predators below it won’t be able to see its silhouette. It is one of the smallest known sharks, rarely reaching lengths of over 45 cm.
(Photo source)

The velvet belly lanternshark (Etmopterus spinax) searches for its prey—fish and squid—in the darkness. While doing so, its belly is illuminated by small, but bright photophores. As it’s a deep water fish, this adaptation helps the velvet belly lanternshark’s body be camouflaged against the faint light coming down from the surface so that predators below it won’t be able to see its silhouette. It is one of the smallest known sharks, rarely reaching lengths of over 45 cm.

(Photo source)

4th April 2013
"Shark-tooth weapons once used for warfare in the Central Pacific suggest that two extinct shark species used to populate the area, a new study says.
Joshua Drew from Columbia University in New York and colleagues from the Field Museum in Chicago scoured natural history museums for the spiky swords, as well as clubs, daggers, lances and spears. The teeth lashed to this sword with coconut fibers and human hair offer evidence of past ecosystems, before written records….”
“‘Had we never done this work, nobody would have ever known that these things ever existed there. It had been erased from our collective memories that these sharks once plied these waters,’ said Drew. 
'I just wanted to do something cool and different,' said Drew, now at Columbia University. 'I just wanted to go down and look at really cool stuff. We were just going to see what was there.'”
(Article)

"Shark-tooth weapons once used for warfare in the Central Pacific suggest that two extinct shark species used to populate the area, a new study says.

Joshua Drew from Columbia University in New York and colleagues from the Field Museum in Chicago scoured natural history museums for the spiky swords, as well as clubs, daggers, lances and spears. The teeth lashed to this sword with coconut fibers and human hair offer evidence of past ecosystems, before written records….”

“‘Had we never done this work, nobody would have ever known that these things ever existed there. It had been erased from our collective memories that these sharks once plied these waters,’ said Drew. 

'I just wanted to do something cool and different,' said Drew, now at Columbia University. 'I just wanted to go down and look at really cool stuff. We were just going to see what was there.'”

(Article)

10th March 2013
The blacktip reef shark (Carcharhinus melanopterus) is a common shark found in the tropical waters of the Indo-Pacific. Their bodies are streamlined, making them powerful swimmers, and—as the name suggests—the tips of their fins are black. They usually inhabit shallow waters and are very curious as a species. They will often approach divers to investigate, which has led to numerous attacks, giving the species a bad reputation. However, as with all sharks, the odds of being attacked by one are still extremely low.
(Source)

The blacktip reef shark (Carcharhinus melanopterus) is a common shark found in the tropical waters of the Indo-Pacific. Their bodies are streamlined, making them powerful swimmers, and—as the name suggests—the tips of their fins are black. They usually inhabit shallow waters and are very curious as a species. They will often approach divers to investigate, which has led to numerous attacks, giving the species a bad reputation. However, as with all sharks, the odds of being attacked by one are still extremely low.

(Source)

10th March 2013
Although it is one of the widest ranged sharks, the blue shark (Prionace glauca) may be threatened by over-harvesting. They migrate seasonally, moving from cooler to warmer waters. Blue sharks sometimes circle prey before attacking and they will gather in large numbers to eviscerate whale or porpoise carcasses. They can also be found following trawling boats, stealing the caught fish. The blue shark is known as a shark species that will attack humans, but just like with any other sharks, getting bitten by one is relatively rare.
(Source(s)) Although it is one of the widest ranged sharks, the blue shark (Prionace glauca) may be threatened by over-harvesting. They migrate seasonally, moving from cooler to warmer waters. Blue sharks sometimes circle prey before attacking and they will gather in large numbers to eviscerate whale or porpoise carcasses. They can also be found following trawling boats, stealing the caught fish. The blue shark is known as a shark species that will attack humans, but just like with any other sharks, getting bitten by one is relatively rare.
(Source(s))

Although it is one of the widest ranged sharks, the blue shark (Prionace glauca) may be threatened by over-harvesting. They migrate seasonally, moving from cooler to warmer waters. Blue sharks sometimes circle prey before attacking and they will gather in large numbers to eviscerate whale or porpoise carcasses. They can also be found following trawling boats, stealing the caught fish. The blue shark is known as a shark species that will attack humans, but just like with any other sharks, getting bitten by one is relatively rare.

(Source(s))

5th January 2013
My dad found this pen abandoned and alone where he works and brought it home for me this morning. The eyes are little weighted marbles suspended in liquid so they google around as you write. Best wake-up present ever.

My dad found this pen abandoned and alone where he works and brought it home for me this morning. The eyes are little weighted marbles suspended in liquid so they google around as you write. Best wake-up present ever.

17th October 2012
The whale shark (Rhincodon typus) is a graceful, slow-moving giant and the largest fish in the world. At 1.5 m wide, its mouth is large enough to fit a human inside, but it is a harmless filter feeder that eats only plankton and small fish. Accounts of these giants describe sightings of individuals up to 20 m in length.To obtain the huge amount of food it needs, it sucks water into its mouth and pumps it out over its gills, where particles of food become trapped by bony projections called gill rakers and are later swallowed. This shark has the thickest skin of any animal, at up to 10 cm thick. Prominent ridges run the length of its body, and it has a large, sickle-shaped tail. The pattern of white spots on its back is unique to each fish, enabling scientists, through analysis of photographs, to identify individuals. While little is known of their ocean trabels, satellite tagging has shown that some whale sharks migrate across entire oceans. Whale shark eggs hatch inside the mother, and she gives birth to live young that reach up to 60 cm in length.Every year, around April, whale sharks migrate to Ningaloo Reef off northwestern Australia for a plankton feast. The plankton explosion results from a simultaneous mass spawning of the reef’s corals, possibly triggered by the full moon.Whale sharks are killed for their meat and fins (used in soup), although they are legally protected in some countries. 
Photo © Ken Knezick & Erik Schlögl The whale shark (Rhincodon typus) is a graceful, slow-moving giant and the largest fish in the world. At 1.5 m wide, its mouth is large enough to fit a human inside, but it is a harmless filter feeder that eats only plankton and small fish. Accounts of these giants describe sightings of individuals up to 20 m in length.To obtain the huge amount of food it needs, it sucks water into its mouth and pumps it out over its gills, where particles of food become trapped by bony projections called gill rakers and are later swallowed. This shark has the thickest skin of any animal, at up to 10 cm thick. Prominent ridges run the length of its body, and it has a large, sickle-shaped tail. The pattern of white spots on its back is unique to each fish, enabling scientists, through analysis of photographs, to identify individuals. While little is known of their ocean trabels, satellite tagging has shown that some whale sharks migrate across entire oceans. Whale shark eggs hatch inside the mother, and she gives birth to live young that reach up to 60 cm in length.Every year, around April, whale sharks migrate to Ningaloo Reef off northwestern Australia for a plankton feast. The plankton explosion results from a simultaneous mass spawning of the reef’s corals, possibly triggered by the full moon.Whale sharks are killed for their meat and fins (used in soup), although they are legally protected in some countries. 
Photo © Ken Knezick & Erik Schlögl
Whale Shark at the surface at Ningaloo Reef

The whale shark (Rhincodon typus) is a graceful, slow-moving giant and the largest fish in the world. At 1.5 m wide, its mouth is large enough to fit a human inside, but it is a harmless filter feeder that eats only plankton and small fish. Accounts of these giants describe sightings of individuals up to 20 m in length.
To obtain the huge amount of food it needs, it sucks water into its mouth and pumps it out over its gills, where particles of food become trapped by bony projections called gill rakers and are later swallowed. This shark has the thickest skin of any animal, at up to 10 cm thick. Prominent ridges run the length of its body, and it has a large, sickle-shaped tail. The pattern of white spots on its back is unique to each fish, enabling scientists, through analysis of photographs, to identify individuals. While little is known of their ocean trabels, satellite tagging has shown that some whale sharks migrate across entire oceans. Whale shark eggs hatch inside the mother, and she gives birth to live young that reach up to 60 cm in length.
Every year, around April, whale sharks migrate to Ningaloo Reef off northwestern Australia for a plankton feast. The plankton explosion results from a simultaneous mass spawning of the reef’s corals, possibly triggered by the full moon.
Whale sharks are killed for their meat and fins (used in soup), although they are legally protected in some countries. 

Photo © Ken Knezick & Erik Schlögl

9th October 2012
The tiger shark (Galeocerdo cuvier) is the second most dangerous shark to humans, after the white shark. It is huge and has a heavy head and a mouth filled with serrated teeth that have the characteristic shape of a cockscomb. One reason it is so dangerous is that it prefers coastal waters and is also found in river estuaries and harbors, and so it frequently comes into contact with humans. It is reputed to eat almost anything—including smaller sharks, even its own young, other fish, marine mammals, turtles, and birds, it is an inveterate scavenger, and a huge variety of garbage—earning them the nickname “the garbage cans of the sea.” The young, born live after hatching from eggs inside the mother, begin life marked with blotches, which become “tiger stripes” in juveniles and fade by adulthood.
(Photo source)

The tiger shark (Galeocerdo cuvier) is the second most dangerous shark to humans, after the white shark. It is huge and has a heavy head and a mouth filled with serrated teeth that have the characteristic shape of a cockscomb. One reason it is so dangerous is that it prefers coastal waters and is also found in river estuaries and harbors, and so it frequently comes into contact with humans. It is reputed to eat almost anything—including smaller sharks, even its own young, other fish, marine mammals, turtles, and birds, it is an inveterate scavenger, and a huge variety of garbage—earning them the nickname “the garbage cans of the sea.” The young, born live after hatching from eggs inside the mother, begin life marked with blotches, which become “tiger stripes” in juveniles and fade by adulthood.

(Photo source)

9th October 2012
Along with the seven other known species of hammerhead sharks, the scalloped hammerhead (Sphyrna lewini) has a strange, flattened, T-shaped head. In this species, the front of the head has three notches, which produces the scalloped shape from which it takes its name. The eyes are located at the sides of the head. Hunting near the seabed, the shark swings its head from side to side, looking for prey such as fish, other sharks, octopus, and crustaceans, and using sensory pits on its head to detect the electrical fields of buried prey such as rays. The head may also function as an airfoil, giving the shark lift and helping it to twist and turn as it chases its prey.
Scalloped hammerheads may be seen in large shoals of over one hundred individuals. They give birth to live young in shallow bays and estuaries, where the skin of the young darkens to give protection against sunlight.
(Photo source)

Along with the seven other known species of hammerhead sharks, the scalloped hammerhead (Sphyrna lewini) has a strange, flattened, T-shaped head. In this species, the front of the head has three notches, which produces the scalloped shape from which it takes its name. The eyes are located at the sides of the head. Hunting near the seabed, the shark swings its head from side to side, looking for prey such as fish, other sharks, octopus, and crustaceans, and using sensory pits on its head to detect the electrical fields of buried prey such as rays. The head may also function as an airfoil, giving the shark lift and helping it to twist and turn as it chases its prey.

Scalloped hammerheads may be seen in large shoals of over one hundred individuals. They give birth to live young in shallow bays and estuaries, where the skin of the young darkens to give protection against sunlight.

(Photo source)

20th September 2012
Shark ‘Rescues’ Man Lost at Sea:A 41-year-old policeman from the Pacific Island of Maiana found himself lost at sea with his brother-in-law, in what was supposed to be a two-hour boat ride. The two men — 41-year-old Toakai Teitoi and 52-year-old Lelu Falaile — started on May 27 with intentions of boating from Kiribati to Maiana. They stopped to fish along the way, slept overnight and awoke in the morning to find they had drifted out of sight of Maiana and were out of fuel. They had food, but no water. Without water or rescue, Falaile’s health failed and he died on July 4.
Teitoi buried his brother at sea and the very next day, a rainstorm that lasted several days allowed Teitoi to fill two 5-gallon containers with water. But weeks continued without incident or resuce. And then on Sept. 11, Teitoi was curled up in the shade under a covered area in the bow of the boat, when he heard a scratching sound on the hull. A shark was bumping against the boat. When the shark had Teitoi’s attention, it swam off.
"He was guiding me to a fishing boat. I looked up and there was the stern of a ship and I could see crew with binoculars looking at me," Teitoi said.
The boat, the Marshalls 203, rescued Teitoi after 106 days at sea.
(Source)

Shark ‘Rescues’ Man Lost at Sea:
A 41-year-old policeman from the Pacific Island of Maiana found himself lost at sea with his brother-in-law, in what was supposed to be a two-hour boat ride. The two men — 41-year-old Toakai Teitoi and 52-year-old Lelu Falaile — started on May 27 with intentions of boating from Kiribati to Maiana. They stopped to fish along the way, slept overnight and awoke in the morning to find they had drifted out of sight of Maiana and were out of fuel. They had food, but no water. Without water or rescue, Falaile’s health failed and he died on July 4.

Teitoi buried his brother at sea and the very next day, a rainstorm that lasted several days allowed Teitoi to fill two 5-gallon containers with water. But weeks continued without incident or resuce. And then on Sept. 11, Teitoi was curled up in the shade under a covered area in the bow of the boat, when he heard a scratching sound on the hull. A shark was bumping against the boat. When the shark had Teitoi’s attention, it swam off.

"He was guiding me to a fishing boat. I looked up and there was the stern of a ship and I could see crew with binoculars looking at me," Teitoi said.

The boat, the Marshalls 203, rescued Teitoi after 106 days at sea.

(Source)

20th September 2012
Sharks are color blind, new research suggests, with the toothy predators likely forever seeing the world in black and white.
The study, published in the latest Royal Society Biology Letters, is the first to investigate the genetic basis and spectral tuning of the shark visual system.
The ramifications could be huge, helping to save both sharks and people.
"The work will have a major influence on human interactions with sharks," co-author Nathan Hart, a research associate professor at the University of Western Australia’s School of Animal Biology and The Oceans Institute, told Discovery News.
(Read more on the implications for sharks and humans alike)

Sharks are color blind, new research suggests, with the toothy predators likely forever seeing the world in black and white.

The study, published in the latest Royal Society Biology Letters, is the first to investigate the genetic basis and spectral tuning of the shark visual system.

The ramifications could be huge, helping to save both sharks and people.

"The work will have a major influence on human interactions with sharks," co-author Nathan Hart, a research associate professor at the University of Western Australia’s School of Animal Biology and The Oceans Institute, told Discovery News.

(Read more on the implications for sharks and humans alike)

25th April 2012
Reaching over 13ft in length and weighing up to 700lbs, the bull shark is one badass freshwater monster. However, bull sharks are not naturally found in freshwater. They have been documented to swim as far as 2,500 miles upriver into freshwater systems. This is often due to the flooding of smaller bodies of water near deltas and estuaries, making paths from one river or lake to another for a short period of time. After the sharks swim far enough upstream, some of these paths evaporate, making it impossible for them to return to sea; therefore, the freshwater systems in which they become entrapped become their new homes.

Reaching over 13ft in length and weighing up to 700lbs, the bull shark is one badass freshwater monster. However, bull sharks are not naturally found in freshwater. They have been documented to swim as far as 2,500 miles upriver into freshwater systems. This is often due to the flooding of smaller bodies of water near deltas and estuaries, making paths from one river or lake to another for a short period of time. After the sharks swim far enough upstream, some of these paths evaporate, making it impossible for them to return to sea; therefore, the freshwater systems in which they become entrapped become their new homes.


I am Ashley, an incredibly introverted 21-year-old environmental enthusiast.
I'm studying to be a marine biologist, but I live near the Great Lakes rather than the ocean.
I have a fierce love for all living things, a very broad sense of humor, and I'm probably too passionate for my own good.
Herein you'll find animals (especially creepy-crawlies), nature, science, art, some of my own photography, and probably more things about my personal life than you would care to know.
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I source all of my own posts unless it's my content, in which case I tag it "personal."
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