7 posts tagged shore

1st June 2013
While there are almost innumerable marine arthropods, few—if any—insects are considered to be truly marine. Pictured above are shore bristletails (Petrobius maritimus), which live along the coast of the British Isles. They’re fast movers and use tiny spikes, called styles, on their ventral side to help grip slippery substrate. These adorable little insects spend their time feeding on detritus and hiding in rock crevasses. When disturbed, they can use their abdomens to catapult themselves short distances to safety.
(Source(s)) While there are almost innumerable marine arthropods, few—if any—insects are considered to be truly marine. Pictured above are shore bristletails (Petrobius maritimus), which live along the coast of the British Isles. They’re fast movers and use tiny spikes, called styles, on their ventral side to help grip slippery substrate. These adorable little insects spend their time feeding on detritus and hiding in rock crevasses. When disturbed, they can use their abdomens to catapult themselves short distances to safety.
(Source(s))

While there are almost innumerable marine arthropods, few—if any—insects are considered to be truly marine. Pictured above are shore bristletails (Petrobius maritimus), which live along the coast of the British Isles. They’re fast movers and use tiny spikes, called styles, on their ventral side to help grip slippery substrate. These adorable little insects spend their time feeding on detritus and hiding in rock crevasses. When disturbed, they can use their abdomens to catapult themselves short distances to safety.

(Source(s))

26th June 2012
That’s right: giant, majestic balls. In the sand. The beach north of Moeraki on New Zealand’s South Island is strewn with large, near-spherical boulders. Their origin is unclear, but the most widely accepted scientific view is that they are mineral consecrations that formed sixty million years ago in mudstones—layers of softer sedimentary rock on the seafloor. These mudstones were later uplifted and now form a cliff at the back of the beach. There, gradual erosion exposes and releases the boulders, which eventually roll down onto the beach. The boulders are up to three meters in diameter and some weigh several tons. That’s right: giant, majestic balls. In the sand. The beach north of Moeraki on New Zealand’s South Island is strewn with large, near-spherical boulders. Their origin is unclear, but the most widely accepted scientific view is that they are mineral consecrations that formed sixty million years ago in mudstones—layers of softer sedimentary rock on the seafloor. These mudstones were later uplifted and now form a cliff at the back of the beach. There, gradual erosion exposes and releases the boulders, which eventually roll down onto the beach. The boulders are up to three meters in diameter and some weigh several tons.

That’s right: giant, majestic balls. In the sand. The beach north of Moeraki on New Zealand’s South Island is strewn with large, near-spherical boulders. Their origin is unclear, but the most widely accepted scientific view is that they are mineral consecrations that formed sixty million years ago in mudstones—layers of softer sedimentary rock on the seafloor. These mudstones were later uplifted and now form a cliff at the back of the beach. There, gradual erosion exposes and releases the boulders, which eventually roll down onto the beach. The boulders are up to three meters in diameter and some weigh several tons.

26th June 2012
The Giant’s Causeway is a tightly packed cluster of some 40,000 columns of basalt (a black volcanic rock). It’s located at the foot of a sea cliff that rises ninety meters on the northern coast of Northern Ireland. Although legend says the formation was created by a giant named Finn McCool, it in fact resulted from the volcanic eruption some sixty million years ago, one of a series that brought about the opening of the North Atlantic. The eruption spewed up vast amounts of liquid basalt lava, which cooled to form the columns. They are up to thirteen meters tall and are mainly hexagonal, although some have four, five, seven, or eight sides. The Giant’s Causeway is a tightly packed cluster of some 40,000 columns of basalt (a black volcanic rock). It’s located at the foot of a sea cliff that rises ninety meters on the northern coast of Northern Ireland. Although legend says the formation was created by a giant named Finn McCool, it in fact resulted from the volcanic eruption some sixty million years ago, one of a series that brought about the opening of the North Atlantic. The eruption spewed up vast amounts of liquid basalt lava, which cooled to form the columns. They are up to thirteen meters tall and are mainly hexagonal, although some have four, five, seven, or eight sides.

The Giant’s Causeway is a tightly packed cluster of some 40,000 columns of basalt (a black volcanic rock). It’s located at the foot of a sea cliff that rises ninety meters on the northern coast of Northern Ireland. Although legend says the formation was created by a giant named Finn McCool, it in fact resulted from the volcanic eruption some sixty million years ago, one of a series that brought about the opening of the North Atlantic. The eruption spewed up vast amounts of liquid basalt lava, which cooled to form the columns. They are up to thirteen meters tall and are mainly hexagonal, although some have four, five, seven, or eight sides.

(Source: tourismontheedge.com)


I am Ashley, an incredibly introverted environmental enthusiast.
I'm studying to be a marine biologist.
I have a fierce love for all living things, a very broad sense of humor, and I'm likely too passionate for my own good.
Herein you'll find animals (especially creepy-crawlies), nature, science, art, some of my own photography, and occasionally a scattering of personal posts.
I'm an avid reader and music-listener, so suggestions are always welcome (you can check out my last.fm if you're interested).
I source all of my own posts unless it's my content, in which case I tag it "personal."
But that tag is littered with a bunch of other, boring things as well, so peruse with caution.

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