22 posts tagged snake

24th June 2013
Black rat snake (Pantherophis obsoletus), commonly found in the northeastern US. They are the largest species of snake in New York and can reach lengths of over two meters, though that is rare. Thankfully, they are nonvenomous. When they feel threatened, like this one did, they shake their tails (in a manner similar to rattlesnakes) in dead leaves, making a rattling noise to ward off predators. Black rat snake (Pantherophis obsoletus), commonly found in the northeastern US. They are the largest species of snake in New York and can reach lengths of over two meters, though that is rare. Thankfully, they are nonvenomous. When they feel threatened, like this one did, they shake their tails (in a manner similar to rattlesnakes) in dead leaves, making a rattling noise to ward off predators.

Black rat snake (Pantherophis obsoletus), commonly found in the northeastern US. They are the largest species of snake in New York and can reach lengths of over two meters, though that is rare. Thankfully, they are nonvenomous. When they feel threatened, like this one did, they shake their tails (in a manner similar to rattlesnakes) in dead leaves, making a rattling noise to ward off predators.

18th February 2013
For some, it is common knowledge that Australia is just crawling with dangerous animals; as it turns out, it’s also slithering with them. The coastal taipan (Oxyuranus scutellatus) is Australia’s most venomous snake, capable of growing up to 3.6 m long. Though it is shy by nature, if disturbed, it can strike with alarming speed. It was historically the case that a taipan bite was a certain death sentence for a human, but with the development of an antivenom, fatalities are much rarer now. The coastal taipan typically feeds on mammals, but is also known to eat birds and lizards.
(Photo)

For some, it is common knowledge that Australia is just crawling with dangerous animals; as it turns out, it’s also slithering with them. The coastal taipan (Oxyuranus scutellatus) is Australia’s most venomous snake, capable of growing up to 3.6 m long. Though it is shy by nature, if disturbed, it can strike with alarming speed. It was historically the case that a taipan bite was a certain death sentence for a human, but with the development of an antivenom, fatalities are much rarer now. The coastal taipan typically feeds on mammals, but is also known to eat birds and lizards.

(Photo)

17th February 2013
The blue coral snake (Calliophis bivirgata) is sometimes colloquially referred to as the “100-pace snake” because it is said that a human can make it 100 paces away after sustaining a bite from this animal before they die. However, there are not many recorded cases of human fatalities due to this snake, which hints that the snake gets a worse reputation than it deserves. Its typical prey is other snakes.
(Photo © Tom Charlton)

The blue coral snake (Calliophis bivirgata) is sometimes colloquially referred to as the “100-pace snake” because it is said that a human can make it 100 paces away after sustaining a bite from this animal before they die. However, there are not many recorded cases of human fatalities due to this snake, which hints that the snake gets a worse reputation than it deserves. Its typical prey is other snakes.

(Photo © Tom Charlton)

16th February 2013
Native to eastern and southern Africa, the black mamba (Dendroaspis polylepis) is not only one of the most venomous snakes in the world, but also one of the fastest. Despite the great length of this snake, it is quite agile and can easily climb and slither along branches and within bushes. It makes its den in hollowed trees or in rock crevices and it is an extremely territorial animal. Its venom is fast-acting and a bite from a black mamba can be fatal if not treated immediately after the incident. However, humans are obviously not on the menu for this predator, whose main food sources are birds and small mammals.
(Photo)

Native to eastern and southern Africa, the black mamba (Dendroaspis polylepis) is not only one of the most venomous snakes in the world, but also one of the fastest. Despite the great length of this snake, it is quite agile and can easily climb and slither along branches and within bushes. It makes its den in hollowed trees or in rock crevices and it is an extremely territorial animal. Its venom is fast-acting and a bite from a black mamba can be fatal if not treated immediately after the incident. However, humans are obviously not on the menu for this predator, whose main food sources are birds and small mammals.

(Photo)

15th December 2012
Inhabiting a relatively small area between Central American and northern South America, the eyelash pit viper (Bothriechis schlegelii) is an arboreal species of snake. Hunting at night, this species feeds on almost anything small enough for it to consume, from birds to lizards and frogs. The raised scales above its eyes give it the appearance of having dramatic eyelashes, hence its common name.
(Photo source)

Inhabiting a relatively small area between Central American and northern South America, the eyelash pit viper (Bothriechis schlegelii) is an arboreal species of snake. Hunting at night, this species feeds on almost anything small enough for it to consume, from birds to lizards and frogs. The raised scales above its eyes give it the appearance of having dramatic eyelashes, hence its common name.

(Photo source)

14th December 2012
Found only in Central and South America, the rainbow boa (Epicrates cenchria) is another species of snake with numerous subspecies. Able to reach 2 m in length, this snake rests during the day and actively hunts at night for prey, such as small mammals, birds, and lizards. Subspecies of this animal vary in color from brown to orange, but most have iridescent scales, as can be seen pictured above.
(Photo source)

Found only in Central and South America, the rainbow boa (Epicrates cenchria) is another species of snake with numerous subspecies. Able to reach 2 m in length, this snake rests during the day and actively hunts at night for prey, such as small mammals, birds, and lizards. Subspecies of this animal vary in color from brown to orange, but most have iridescent scales, as can be seen pictured above.

(Photo source)

14th December 2012
The carpet python (Morelia spilota) is a species of snake that is widespread across Australia. There is a great amount of variation in this species of snake, leading to a number of subspecies, each with their own common name. Pictured above is the jungle carpet python (Morelia spilota cheynei), which inhabits the rain forests of Queensland, where it spends most of its time in the trees.
(Photo source)

The carpet python (Morelia spilota) is a species of snake that is widespread across Australia. There is a great amount of variation in this species of snake, leading to a number of subspecies, each with their own common name. Pictured above is the jungle carpet python (Morelia spilota cheynei), which inhabits the rain forests of Queensland, where it spends most of its time in the trees.

(Photo source)

18th September 2012
Banded Snake Eel(Myrichthys colubrinus)
Cleverly disguised to look like the venomous yellow-lipped sea krait, the banded snake eel is avoided by most predators. This allows it to hunt safely over sand flats and seagrass beds near coral reefs for small fish and crustaceans. Most individuals of this species are banded with broad black and white bands, but in some areas these eels have dark blotches between the bands. This color variant may eventually be identified as a different species. The banded snake eel has a pointed head with a pair of large tubular nostrils on the upper jaw that point downwards. This arrangement gives the fish an excellent sense of smell that allows it to seek out prey hidden beneath the sand surface.
With no fins except for very small pectoral fins, the banded snake eel swims by undulating its long body. When not hunting, it buries itself in the sand using the hard, pointed tip of its tail to burrow in tail-first. These fish are most active by night. They tend to remain in their burrows during the day and so are not often seen by divers.
(Photo © Roger Blum)

Banded Snake Eel
(Myrichthys colubrinus)

Cleverly disguised to look like the venomous yellow-lipped sea krait, the banded snake eel is avoided by most predators. This allows it to hunt safely over sand flats and seagrass beds near coral reefs for small fish and crustaceans. Most individuals of this species are banded with broad black and white bands, but in some areas these eels have dark blotches between the bands. This color variant may eventually be identified as a different species. The banded snake eel has a pointed head with a pair of large tubular nostrils on the upper jaw that point downwards. This arrangement gives the fish an excellent sense of smell that allows it to seek out prey hidden beneath the sand surface.

With no fins except for very small pectoral fins, the banded snake eel swims by undulating its long body. When not hunting, it buries itself in the sand using the hard, pointed tip of its tail to burrow in tail-first. These fish are most active by night. They tend to remain in their burrows during the day and so are not often seen by divers.

(Photo © Roger Blum)

12th August 2012
The grass snake (Natrix natrix) is a semiaquatic predator, spending much of its time in damp places or in still water. A good swimmer, it can sometimes be spotted rippling its way across the surface of ponds, in search of frogs and fishes. It is one of the most widespread snakes in Europe. Adults are olive-brown, greenish, or gray, usually with a contrasting yellow or white collar just behind the head. In places where summers are cool, females often lay their eggs in compost heaps, the warmth of decaying vegetation helping incubation.
The grass snake ejects a foul-smelling fluid if handled, and sometimes reacts to extreme danger by playing dead. To make the performance as convincing as possible, it turns partly upside down with its mouth open and tongue exposed.
Photo © Fabio Pupin

The grass snake (Natrix natrix) is a semiaquatic predator, spending much of its time in damp places or in still water. A good swimmer, it can sometimes be spotted rippling its way across the surface of ponds, in search of frogs and fishes. It is one of the most widespread snakes in Europe. Adults are olive-brown, greenish, or gray, usually with a contrasting yellow or white collar just behind the head. In places where summers are cool, females often lay their eggs in compost heaps, the warmth of decaying vegetation helping incubation.

The grass snake ejects a foul-smelling fluid if handled, and sometimes reacts to extreme danger by playing dead. To make the performance as convincing as possible, it turns partly upside down with its mouth open and tongue exposed.

Photo © Fabio Pupin

1st May 2012
I just learned what a water moccasin is! Gimme a break, I live in the north.
Water moccasins (Agkistrodon piscivorus) are—from what I gather—territorial, semi-aquiatic, venomous snakes that inhabit the southeastern US.
Wikipedia says their aggressiveness is greatly exaggerated, but my best friend was just telling me about how he was canoeing with his family and a water moccasin left shore and came straight at their boat. This could be chalked up to curiosity on the animal’s part…but still.
When sufficiently stressed or threatened, this species engages in a characteristic threat display that includes vibrating its tail and throwing its head back with its mouth open to display the startling white interior, often making a loud hiss while the neck and front part of the body are pulled into an S-shaped position. Many of its common names, including “cottonmouth” and “gapper”, refer to this behavior, while its habit of snapping its jaws shut when anything touches its mouth has earned it the name “trap-jaw” in some areas.

I just learned what a water moccasin is! Gimme a break, I live in the north.

Water moccasins (Agkistrodon piscivorus) are—from what I gather—territorial, semi-aquiatic, venomous snakes that inhabit the southeastern US.

Wikipedia says their aggressiveness is greatly exaggerated, but my best friend was just telling me about how he was canoeing with his family and a water moccasin left shore and came straight at their boat. This could be chalked up to curiosity on the animal’s part…but still.

When sufficiently stressed or threatened, this species engages in a characteristic threat display that includes vibrating its tail and throwing its head back with its mouth open to display the startling white interior, often making a loud hiss while the neck and front part of the body are pulled into an S-shaped position. Many of its common names, including “cottonmouth” and “gapper”, refer to this behavior, while its habit of snapping its jaws shut when anything touches its mouth has earned it the name “trap-jaw” in some areas.


I am Ashley, an incredibly introverted 21-year-old environmental enthusiast.
I'm studying to be a marine biologist, but I live near the Great Lakes rather than the ocean.
I have a fierce love for all living things, a very broad sense of humor, and I'm probably too passionate for my own good.
Herein you'll find animals (especially creepy-crawlies), nature, science, art, some of my own photography, and probably more things about my personal life than you would care to know.
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I source all of my own posts unless it's my content, in which case I tag it "personal."
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