4 posts tagged tropical

26th March 2012
Pictured are two copepods from two different places around the globe. The one on the left has noticeably less frills and extra “stuff” attached to it, where the one one the right seems to be covered in fringe. These distinctions are due to viscosity differences in waters of different temperatures. Colder water has a higher viscosity than warmer water, so copepods in cooler waters don’t need as much “stuff” to help keep themselves up high in the water column, whereas copepods in tropical waters need all that fringe to keep from sinking quickly down to the bottom of the ocean.

Pictured are two copepods from two different places around the globe. The one on the left has noticeably less frills and extra “stuff” attached to it, where the one one the right seems to be covered in fringe. These distinctions are due to viscosity differences in waters of different temperatures. Colder water has a higher viscosity than warmer water, so copepods in cooler waters don’t need as much “stuff” to help keep themselves up high in the water column, whereas copepods in tropical waters need all that fringe to keep from sinking quickly down to the bottom of the ocean.

19th September 2011
fyeah-seacreatures:

The Christmas Tree Worm (Spirobranchus giganteus) is a colorful marine worm with beautiful, spiraling plumes that resemble a fir tree. These animals are colorful, and can be red, orange, yellow, blue and white. These worms lives on tropical coral reefs throughout the world.The Christmas tree worm’s plumes are used for feeding and respiration. These worms use their plumes to catch plankton and other small particles passing in the water. Cilia then pass the food to the worm’s mouth.

fyeah-seacreatures:

The Christmas Tree Worm (Spirobranchus giganteus) is a colorful marine worm with beautiful, spiraling plumes that resemble a fir tree. These animals are colorful, and can be red, orange, yellow, blue and white. These worms lives on tropical coral reefs throughout the world.
The Christmas tree worm’s plumes are used for feeding and respiration. These worms use their plumes to catch plankton and other small particles passing in the water. Cilia then pass the food to the worm’s mouth.

Reblogged from : ocean-ology


I am Ashley, an incredibly introverted environmental enthusiast.
I'm studying to be a marine biologist.
I have a fierce love for all living things, a very broad sense of humor, and I'm likely too passionate for my own good.
Herein you'll find animals (especially creepy-crawlies), nature, science, art, some of my own photography, and occasionally a scattering of personal posts.
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I source all of my own posts unless it's my content, in which case I tag it "personal."
But that tag is littered with a bunch of other, boring things as well, so peruse with caution.

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