3 posts tagged wolffish

19th October 2012
The large and ferocious-looking Wolf-fish (Anarhichas lupus) is normally found on rocky reefs in deep water. However, north of the British Isles, divers regularly see them in shallow water. They are not aggressive to divers unless provoked. The wolf-fish has a long body and a huge head with strong caninelike teeth at the front and molarlike teeth at the sides. These are used to break open hard-shelled invertebrates such as mussels, crabs, and sea urchins. Worn teeth are replaced each year. The skin is tough, leathery, and wrinkled and is usually grayish with darker vertical bands extending down the sides.
Spawning takes place during the winter. The female lays thousands of yellowish eggs in round clumps among rocks and seaweeds and the male guards them until they hatch. In spite of their unattractive appearance, wolf-fish are good to eat and are caught by anglers. They are also sometimes caught in trawl nets.
I dedicate this post to my friends down at Stony Brook. ;)(Photo source 1 / 2)
What's a seawolf? I'M A SEAWOLF.
The large and ferocious-looking Wolf-fish (Anarhichas lupus) is normally found on rocky reefs in deep water. However, north of the British Isles, divers regularly see them in shallow water. They are not aggressive to divers unless provoked. The wolf-fish has a long body and a huge head with strong caninelike teeth at the front and molarlike teeth at the sides. These are used to break open hard-shelled invertebrates such as mussels, crabs, and sea urchins. Worn teeth are replaced each year. The skin is tough, leathery, and wrinkled and is usually grayish with darker vertical bands extending down the sides.
Spawning takes place during the winter. The female lays thousands of yellowish eggs in round clumps among rocks and seaweeds and the male guards them until they hatch. In spite of their unattractive appearance, wolf-fish are good to eat and are caught by anglers. They are also sometimes caught in trawl nets.
I dedicate this post to my friends down at Stony Brook. ;)(Photo source 1 / 2)

The large and ferocious-looking Wolf-fish (Anarhichas lupus) is normally found on rocky reefs in deep water. However, north of the British Isles, divers regularly see them in shallow water. They are not aggressive to divers unless provoked. The wolf-fish has a long body and a huge head with strong caninelike teeth at the front and molarlike teeth at the sides. These are used to break open hard-shelled invertebrates such as mussels, crabs, and sea urchins. Worn teeth are replaced each year. The skin is tough, leathery, and wrinkled and is usually grayish with darker vertical bands extending down the sides.

Spawning takes place during the winter. The female lays thousands of yellowish eggs in round clumps among rocks and seaweeds and the male guards them until they hatch. In spite of their unattractive appearance, wolf-fish are good to eat and are caught by anglers. They are also sometimes caught in trawl nets.

I dedicate this post to my friends down at Stony Brook. ;)
(Photo source/ 2)

20th September 2011


ATLANTIC WOLFFISHAnarhichas lupus©Espen Rekdal

The Atlantic wolffish’s distinguishing feature, from which it gets its  common name, is its extensive teeth structure. Its dentition (teeth)  distinguishes the Atlanitic wolffish from all the other members of the  Anarhichadidae family. Both the lower and upper jaw are armed with four  to six fang-like, strong conical teeth. Behind the conical teeth in the  upper jaw, there are three rows of crushing teeth. The central row has  four pairs of molars and the outer rows house blunted conical teeth. The  lower jaw has two rows of molars behind the primary conical teeth. The  wolffish’s throat is also scattered with serrated teeth.

The Atlantic wolffish are primarily stationary fish, rarely moving from their rocky home. They are benthic dwellers,  living on the hard ocean floor, frequently seen in nooks and small  caves. They like cold water, at depths of 76 to 120 meters (250 to  400 ft). They are usually found in waters of 34-37°F (1-2°C) and  sometimes as low as 30°F (-1°C). Since they live in nearly freezing  waters, in order to keep their blood moving smoothly, their blood  contains a natural antifreeze.

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seawolf_%28fish%29



explosionsoflife:
What’s a seawolf? I’m a seawolf..!? (That’s my college’s chant.)

ATLANTIC WOLFFISH
Anarhichas lupus
©Espen Rekdal

The Atlantic wolffish’s distinguishing feature, from which it gets its common name, is its extensive teeth structure. Its dentition (teeth) distinguishes the Atlanitic wolffish from all the other members of the Anarhichadidae family. Both the lower and upper jaw are armed with four to six fang-like, strong conical teeth. Behind the conical teeth in the upper jaw, there are three rows of crushing teeth. The central row has four pairs of molars and the outer rows house blunted conical teeth. The lower jaw has two rows of molars behind the primary conical teeth. The wolffish’s throat is also scattered with serrated teeth.

The Atlantic wolffish are primarily stationary fish, rarely moving from their rocky home. They are benthic dwellers, living on the hard ocean floor, frequently seen in nooks and small caves. They like cold water, at depths of 76 to 120 meters (250 to 400 ft). They are usually found in waters of 34-37°F (1-2°C) and sometimes as low as 30°F (-1°C). Since they live in nearly freezing waters, in order to keep their blood moving smoothly, their blood contains a natural antifreeze.

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seawolf_%28fish%29

explosionsoflife:

What’s a seawolf? I’m a seawolf..!? (That’s my college’s chant.)

Reblogged from : animalworld


I am Ashley, an incredibly introverted 21-year-old environmental enthusiast.
I'm studying to be a marine biologist, but I live near the Great Lakes rather than the ocean.
I have a fierce love for all living things, a very broad sense of humor, and I'm probably too passionate for my own good.
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